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I am trying to write a function that would create a regular grid of 5 pixels by 5 pixels inside a 2d array. I was hoping some combination of numpy.arange and numpy.repeat might do it, but so far I haven't had any luck because numpy.repeat will just repeat along the same row.

Here is an example:

Let's say I want a 5x5 grid inside a 2d array of shape (20, 15). It should look like:

array([[ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [ 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2],
       [ 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5],
       [ 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5],
       [ 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5],
       [ 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5],
       [ 3, 3, 3, 3, 3, 4, 4, 4, 4, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 5],
       [ 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8],
       [ 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8],
       [ 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8],
       [ 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8],
       [ 6, 6, 6, 6, 6, 7, 7, 7, 7, 7, 8, 8, 8, 8, 8],
       [ 9, 9, 9, 9, 9,10,10,10,10,10,11,11,11,11,11],
       [ 9, 9, 9, 9, 9,10,10,10,10,10,11,11,11,11,11],
       [ 9, 9, 9, 9, 9,10,10,10,10,10,11,11,11,11,11],
       [ 9, 9, 9, 9, 9,10,10,10,10,10,11,11,11,11,11],
       [ 9, 9, 9, 9, 9,10,10,10,10,10,11,11,11,11,11]])

I realize I could simply use a loop and slicing to accomplish this, but I could be applying this to very large arrays and I worry that the performance of that would be too slow or impractical.

Can anyone recommend a method to accomplish this?

Thanks in advance.

UPDATE:

All the answers provided seem to work well. Can anyone tell me which will be the most efficient to use for large arrays? By large array I mean it could be 100000 x 100000 or more with 15 x 15 grid cell sizes.

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1  
Here are two solutions, one involving numpy.kron, one involving numpy.repeat: stackoverflow.com/questions/7525214/how-to-scale-a-numpy-array –  Brionius Oct 14 '13 at 16:02
    
I posted an answer here, but it turns out to be the same method @NPE used in your linked question. –  jorgeca Oct 14 '13 at 16:09
    
@Brionius - numpy.kron definitely worked. Do you think there is much of a performance difference between that and @Mr. E's answer? –  Brian Oct 14 '13 at 16:36
    
The output array is what dominates everything else in your problem, so differences will be small. If size is (m, n), and the cells are (d, d), Mr. E builds two arrays of size (m,) and (n,), and performs m * n additions. My solution creates an array (m * n / d / d,) and performs no other operations. My guess is that for large m and n and relatively small d, Mr. E's solution will be faster and more efficient, but not by much. By looking at the source code, I am pretty sure np.kron will perform worse. –  Jaime Oct 14 '13 at 20:43
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3 Answers 3

Broadcasting is the answer here:

m, n, d = 20, 15, 5
arr = np.empty((m, n), dtype=np.int)
arr_view = arr.reshape(m // d, d, n // d, d)
vals = np.arange(m // d * n // d).reshape(m // d, 1, n // d, 1)
arr_view[:] = vals

>>> arr
array([[ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  1,  1,  1,  1,  1,  2,  2,  2,  2,  2],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  1,  1,  1,  1,  1,  2,  2,  2,  2,  2],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  1,  1,  1,  1,  1,  2,  2,  2,  2,  2],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  1,  1,  1,  1,  1,  2,  2,  2,  2,  2],
       [ 0,  0,  0,  0,  0,  1,  1,  1,  1,  1,  2,  2,  2,  2,  2],
       [ 3,  3,  3,  3,  3,  4,  4,  4,  4,  4,  5,  5,  5,  5,  5],
       [ 3,  3,  3,  3,  3,  4,  4,  4,  4,  4,  5,  5,  5,  5,  5],
       [ 3,  3,  3,  3,  3,  4,  4,  4,  4,  4,  5,  5,  5,  5,  5],
       [ 3,  3,  3,  3,  3,  4,  4,  4,  4,  4,  5,  5,  5,  5,  5],
       [ 3,  3,  3,  3,  3,  4,  4,  4,  4,  4,  5,  5,  5,  5,  5],
       [ 6,  6,  6,  6,  6,  7,  7,  7,  7,  7,  8,  8,  8,  8,  8],
       [ 6,  6,  6,  6,  6,  7,  7,  7,  7,  7,  8,  8,  8,  8,  8],
       [ 6,  6,  6,  6,  6,  7,  7,  7,  7,  7,  8,  8,  8,  8,  8],
       [ 6,  6,  6,  6,  6,  7,  7,  7,  7,  7,  8,  8,  8,  8,  8],
       [ 6,  6,  6,  6,  6,  7,  7,  7,  7,  7,  8,  8,  8,  8,  8],
       [ 9,  9,  9,  9,  9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11],
       [ 9,  9,  9,  9,  9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11],
       [ 9,  9,  9,  9,  9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11],
       [ 9,  9,  9,  9,  9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11],
       [ 9,  9,  9,  9,  9, 10, 10, 10, 10, 10, 11, 11, 11, 11, 11]])
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Thanks for the answer. Unfortunately, this did not work for me. I ended up with arr_view.shape = (4L, 5L, 3L, 5L) and not (20, 15). –  Brian Oct 14 '13 at 16:32
    
@Brian arr_view is a view of your original array that is only used to have a shape that is broadcastable. It is arr that you want to look at: it remains with shape (20, 15). –  Jaime Oct 14 '13 at 17:10
    
I see. Thanks for clarifying. I'm unfamiliar with the concept of views. I'll have to look into that. –  Brian Oct 14 '13 at 17:18
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Similar to Jaime's answer:

np.repeat(np.arange(0, 10, 3), 4)[..., None] + np.repeat(np.arange(3), 5)[None, ...]
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This seems much simpler than Jaime's answer and much closer to what I was trying to do. I'm unfamiliar with [..., None]. What exactly does this mean? –  Brian Oct 14 '13 at 16:34
    
That's called broadcasting. Best explanations are given here and here. Read about the ellipsis and more about broadcasting here. You may see np.newaxis used instead of None in the docs. –  Mr E Oct 14 '13 at 16:45
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kron will do this expansion (as Brionius also suggested in the comments):

xi, xj, ni, nj = 5, 5, 4, 3
r = np.kron(np.arange(ni*nj).reshape((ni,nj)), np.ones((xi, xj)))

Although I haven't tested it, I assume it's less efficient than the broadcasting approach, but a bit more concise and easier to understand (I hope). It's likely less efficient because: 1) it requires the array of ones, 2) it does xi*xj multiplications by 1, and 3) it does a bunch of concats.

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This didn't actually work. A small correction is required. np.ones((xi*ni, xj*nj)) should be np.ones((xi, xj)). With the correction it did work. Thanks for the explanation of efficiency. –  Brian Oct 14 '13 at 17:22
    
Thanks. Corrected. –  tom10 Oct 14 '13 at 17:49
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