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How can I delete an integer from a list initialized with int list[9999]? I know how to remove a specified integer from that list by specify a key of list, but I will need to shift other elements to the left. What is the alternative?, shifting all elements is a highly cost CPU operation, should I use a Linked List and delete from memory that entity from the list, the other elements to be untouched? Thanks!

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closed as off-topic by Grijesh Chauhan, dandan78, Arnaud Denoyelle, Lorenzo Donati, bennofs Mar 1 '14 at 13:11

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Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. –  bennofs Mar 1 '14 at 13:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want constant time insertion/deletion, a linked list is pretty much required - but iterating to the desired element is still going to be linear time. However, there may be a better way to optimize your program. Are you performing this operation very frequently? Can you maybe perform this operation less frequently by changing the structure of your program? A CPU can shift 39K (worst-case scenario with 10000 elements) of data pretty darn quickly. Are you sure this is your bottleneck?

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I'm trying to implement an hybrid sort algorithm using min and max and insertion which approach n*log(n) alg. complexity but that of moving elements operation cost +n operations more. Thanks for your help! –  LXSoft Oct 14 '13 at 16:22
1  
OK. Well, if you're doing this for fun/academic reasons then best of luck to you, but you should know that this is an extremely well researched area. Unless you've got some very specific constraints on your input data that can be exploited to make sorting faster, you might be better of using an existing sorting algorithm instead of trying to invent a new one. A Google search for sorting algorithm is a good place to start. –  Brent Oct 14 '13 at 16:27
    
I know there exist almost 10 powerfull sorting algorithms, it is only for academic purposes, we need to implement algorithms that reach the complexity n*log(n), and I am thinking of some unique by parse list and select min and max delete from list and ther parse again delete min+max 100 elements 250 opeations required 100*log(100) = 200, I achieved the best, that will help me at laboratory, only reason is deleting permanently an item from that list. Your post helped me! Thanks again! –  LXSoft Oct 14 '13 at 16:33

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