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I've been using Valgrind to look for memory leaks in my code, and while no memory leaks are being found, some errors are reported all of them originating at a single function/class method:

==17043== ERROR SUMMARY: 10100 errors from 3 contexts (suppressed: 0 from 0)
==17043== 
==17043== 100 errors in context 1 of 3:
==17043== Syscall param socketcall.sendto(msg) points to uninitialised byte(s)
==17043==    at 0x5441DA2: send (send.c:28)
==17043==    by 0x404C2D: unix_socket::sendMsg(char, double) (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043==    by 0x404F1C: unix_socket::sendVectorXd(Eigen::Matrix<double, -1, 1, 0, -1, 1> const&) (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043==    by 0x401F2A: main (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043==  Address 0x7feffff61 is on thread 1's stack
==17043==  Uninitialised value was created by a stack allocation
==17043==    at 0x404BE6: unix_socket::sendMsg(char, double) (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043== 
==17043== 
==17043== 100 errors in context 2 of 3:
==17043== Syscall param socketcall.sendto(msg) points to uninitialised byte(s)
==17043==    at 0x5441DA2: send (send.c:28)
==17043==    by 0x404C2D: unix_socket::sendMsg(char, double) (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043==    by 0x404E8A: unix_socket::sendVectorXd(Eigen::Matrix<double, -1, 1, 0, -1, 1> const&) (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043==    by 0x401F2A: main (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043==  Address 0x7feffff61 is on thread 1's stack
==17043==  Uninitialised value was created by a stack allocation
==17043==    at 0x404BE6: unix_socket::sendMsg(char, double) (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043== 
==17043== 
==17043== 9900 errors in context 3 of 3:
==17043== Syscall param socketcall.sendto(msg) points to uninitialised byte(s)
==17043==    at 0x5441DA2: send (send.c:28)
==17043==    by 0x404C2D: unix_socket::sendMsg(char, double) (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043==    by 0x404EE8: unix_socket::sendVectorXd(Eigen::Matrix<double, -1, 1, 0, -1, 1> const&) (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043==    by 0x401F2A: main (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043==  Address 0x7feffff61 is on thread 1's stack
==17043==  Uninitialised value was created by a stack allocation
==17043==    at 0x404BE6: unix_socket::sendMsg(char, double) (in /home/joao/CloudPT/Bolsa/Webots/controllers/darwin-pi2/client)
==17043== 
==17043== ERROR SUMMARY: 10100 errors from 3 contexts (suppressed: 0 from 0)

The sendMsg(const char _type, const double _value), that the errors are pointing at, is part of unix_socket class:

//...
typedef struct{
    char type;    
    double value; 
} MESSAGE;

//...
int unix_socket::sendMsg(const char _type, const double _value){
    MESSAGE msg;
    msg.type=_type;
    msg.value=_value;
    int n = send(client_sock, &msg, sizeof(msg), 0);
    if (n < 0) {
        perror("send");
        return -1;
    } 
    c_sent=msg.type;
    v_sent=msg.value;
    return 0;
}

I don't see what is the problem. Where exactly are the uninitialized values? Or should I just ignore the errors reported by Valgrind?

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Look at the MESSAGE struct:

typedef struct{
    char type;    
    double value; 
} MESSAGE;

Due to data structure alignment, value's address may be forced to align to address of a multiple of word size. Therefore, several unused bytes is padded between MESSAGE::type and MESSAGE::value. Those are the bytes which weren't initialized and thus reported by Valgrind.

As a workaround, you could force initializing the whole struct by memset().

MESSAGE msg;
memset(&msg, 0, sizeof(MESSAGE));
msg.type=_type;
msg.value=_value;
share|improve this answer
    
An alternative would be to pack the structure into a byte-vector and send that, tightened to the exact size of each element. Sending structures over the wire in-struct-form is never a grand idea. A client reading the current mechanism has no way of knowing what the structure padding is, and as a consequence has no way of knowing whether value is aligned on 1-byte, 2-bytes, 4-bytes, or even 8-bytes. Were I to code this I would probably use a length-definitive protocol and have both pack and unpack code to make sure values are correct, thereby eliminating alignment issues. – WhozCraig Oct 14 '13 at 16:52
    
You're wright, that worked! However, leaving it as it were, what drawbacks could I potentially encounter? – joaocandre Oct 14 '13 at 16:53
    
@WhozCraig I'm just using it as Unix sockets to share data between two distinct programs, would it be worth the trouble? – joaocandre Oct 14 '13 at 16:55
    
@joaocandre So long as they're both compiled with identical struct-packing settings or this specific structure is #pragma'd to use a single-byte packing, then no, you won't have issues. But imagine if one end used 4-byte alignment and the other used single-byte. The one end would expect the structure to be 12 bytes, while the other would expect 9. Clearly that isn't going to fly. If you have total control of both ends you're going to be ok as-is, so long as everyone plays by the same rules. What I described above is how I would rig the game to ensure it works regardless of said-rules. – WhozCraig Oct 14 '13 at 16:59
    
@joaocandre and note: this is currently the best answer for your question, so if it helped it should be both-up-voted and marked (checked) as such. – WhozCraig Oct 14 '13 at 17:00

Although @timrau has described quite correctly what the core problem is here (alignment/packing), I'm not a fan of the proposed solution.

You have described a MESSAGE in your code as consisting of a char and a double. The size of the actual data structure in memory however is not sizeof(char) + sizeof(double), and that is the core problem.

The proposed solution suggests simply clearing out all of the bits of the MESSAGE structure before filling in the important bits. The problem I have with that is both a semantic one a technical one -- the size of the data structure sent down the wire is not an accurate representation of what you modeled in the code. In other words, you're not just sending a char and a double -- you're sending a char, a double and some other cruft (padding).

My suggestion is to get rid of the cruft and send only what you modeled in your code.

There is no direct support in C++ to turn off alignment and padding, but all compilers I'm aware of provide a simple mechanism to align data structures to N bytes:

#pragma pack (push, 1)

typedef struct{
    char type;    
    double value; 
} MESSAGE;

#pragma pack (pop)

This will make the MESSAGE data structure exactly what you've modeled in your code, with no padding. Doing this makes the memset unnecesarry, and you'll send exactly sizeof(char) + sizeof(double) bytes down the wire.

share|improve this answer
    
This is probably an elementary question, but even if the this struct is packed to 1-byte alignment, how will the receiving end (other side of the socket) know that? – joaocandre Oct 14 '13 at 19:11
    
The client will need the same structure definition -- just like ifyou didn't pack. – John Dibling Oct 14 '13 at 19:16
    
If I had to do this quick, this is the approach I would take. If I had to do it portably, I would likely spend the time to serialize the members. But this still deserves my up vote, and has it accordingly. It is, from all I've seen, enough for the OP's requirements. – WhozCraig Oct 14 '13 at 19:28
    
@WhozCraig: Portability is subjective. I have been doing this for many years on many platforms. – John Dibling Oct 14 '13 at 19:48
    
Certainly it is so-stated as subjective, and I have little-doubt you would not do this between platforms where sizeof(double) was not identical. – WhozCraig Oct 14 '13 at 20:00

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