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void output_list_contents(std::list<tuple<string, int, double,int>> &my_list)
{
    for(std::list<tuple<string, int, double,int> >::iterator it =my_list.begin(); it!= my_list.end(); ++it)
    {

    }
}

I'm trying to output the information from all tuples stored within an STL list. I don't know the syntax and I have spent the past hour googling for an answer, but sadly I haven't come across anything. I'm struggling with the syntax and logic to get access to the tuples stored within.

Can anyone help me out here please?

share|improve this question
    
Isn't *it the tuple stored within the list? –  Yuxiu Li Oct 14 '13 at 17:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like:

void output_list_contents(std::list<tuple<string, int, double,int>> &my_list)
{
    for(const auto& e : my_list)
    {
        std::cout << std::get<0>(e) << " " << std::get<1>(e) << " "
                  << std::get<2>(e) << " " << std::get<3>(e) << std::endl;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, this is fantastic and works, but i would like to understand why it works. I would appreciate an explanation of "auto& e" or if you could provide me with a link that would help me understand. –  James Oct 14 '13 at 18:02
2  
@James It's called a range-based for loop. The const auto& just bind the element based on what the container contains, hence auto deduces to the tuple in your example. const auto& is used instead of auto to avoid copying the tuples while iterating the list. –  Daniel Frey Oct 14 '13 at 18:04
    
I understand how the auto works, and i understand how it goes through the list, but what is the value of e and what does this value do? –  James Oct 14 '13 at 18:07
    
@James e (short for element) is just the tuple. It's like the iterator of your traditional loop, just that the iterator is conceptually a pointer to the element (which need to be dereferenced), while the range-based loop provide a reference to the element itself (with const auto&). e is different each time the loop is executed, of course (like an iterator which is advanced with ++it). –  Daniel Frey Oct 14 '13 at 18:10
    
Thank you so much. I understand it now. :) –  James Oct 14 '13 at 18:12

First overload operator<< for tuple<string, int, double,int>:

std::ostream& opertaor<<(std::ostream& out, 
                              tuple<string,int,double,int> const & t)
{
     return out << "{" << std::get<0>(t) 
                << "," << std::get<1>(t) 
                << "," << std::get<2>(t) 
                << "," << std::get<3>(t) << "}"; 
}

then use it in the loop as:

for(std::list<tuple<string, int, double,int> >::iterator it =my_list.begin(); 
                       it!= my_list.end(); ++it)
{
     std::cout << *it << std::endl;
}

Oh that is ugly. Better use range-based for loop and auto:

for(auto const & item : my_list)
      std::cout << item << std::endl;

Hope that helps.


A generalized implementation of operator<< for std::tuple would be this:

namespace detail
{
      template<int ... N> 
      struct seq 
      { 
         using type = seq<N...>; 
         template<int I>
         struct push_back : seq<N..., I> {};
      };

      template<int N> 
      struct genseq : genseq<N-1>::type::template push_back<N-1> {};

      template<> 
      struct genseq<0> : seq<> {};

      template<typename ... Types, int ...N>
      void print(std::ostream & out, std::tuple<Types...> const & t, seq<N...>)
      {
         const auto max = sizeof...(N);
         auto sink = {
                      (out << "{", 0),
                      (out << (N?",":"") << std::get<N>(t) , 0)...,
                      (out << "}", 0)
                     };
      }
}
template<typename ... Types>
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream & out, std::tuple<Types...> const & t)
{
   detail::print(out, t, typename detail::genseq<sizeof...(Types)>::type());
   return out;
}

This generalized operator<< should be able to print std::tuple with any number of template arguments, as long as all template arguments support operator<< in turn.

Test code:

int main()
{
    std::cout << std::make_tuple(10, 20.0, std::string("Nawaz")) << std::endl;
    std::cout << std::make_tuple(10, 20.0, std::string("Nawaz"), 9089) << std::endl;
}

Output:

{10,20,Nawaz}
{10,20,Nawaz,9089}

Online Demo :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your input, it gives me another view of the answer. –  James Oct 14 '13 at 18:13
    
@James: I didn't give you any input. I gave you only output. :P –  Nawaz Oct 14 '13 at 18:21
void output_list_contents(std::list<std::tuple<std::string, int, double, int>>& my_list)
{
    for (auto tup : my_list)
    {
        print_tuple(tup);
    }
}

And this is how print_tuple looks:

template <typename... Ts, int... Is>
void print_tuple(std::tuple<Ts...>& tup, std::index_sequence<Is...>)
{
    auto l = { ((std::cout << std::get<Is>(tup)), 0)... };
}

template <typename... Ts>
void print_tuple(std::tuple<Ts...>& tup)
{
    print_tuple(tup, std::index_sequence_for<Ts...>{});
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the help :) –  James Oct 14 '13 at 18:15
    
@James Do you have C++14 support? –  0x499602D2 Oct 14 '13 at 18:28
    
no, don't worry about it its all sorted :) thanks anyway. –  James Oct 14 '13 at 21:06
    
Why is std::index_sequence<Is...> in the second print_tuple? It must be a typo. –  Nawaz Oct 15 '13 at 6:11
    
@Nawaz It is, thanks. –  0x499602D2 Oct 15 '13 at 14:24

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