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I've tried to implement an algorithm that would search for both minimum and maximum elements in a given array, and used the ideas from Cormen's Introduction to Algorithms. My code compiles and starts working, outputs the generated random array and then does nothing for a really long time. Why could that be?

The code is this:

// fast min and max --cormen exercise 1.cpp: entry point
//implemented from a verbal description in cormen's book, p 243

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <vector>
#include <ctime>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>

struct min_and_max
{
    int min, max;
};


min_and_max find_min_and_max(std::vector<int>& A)
{
    int n = A.size();
    int min, max;
    if (n%2 == 1)
        min = max = A[0];
    if (n%2 == 0)
        if (A[0] < A[1])
        {
            min = A[0];
            max = A[1];
        }
        else
        {
            min = A[1];
            max = A[0];
        }
    for(int i = 2; i < A.size(); (i + 2))
    {
        if (A[i] < A[i+1])
        {
            if (min > A[i])
                min = A[i];
            if (max < A[i+1])
                max = A[i+1];
        }
        else
        {
            if (min > A[i+1])
                min = A[i+1];
            if (max < A[i])
                max = A[i];
        }
    }
    min_and_max result;
    result.min = min;
    result.max = max;

    return result;
}

int main()
{
    std::srand(std::time(0));
    std::vector<int> A(10);
    for (auto i = 0; i < A.size(); i++)
        {
            A[i] = rand() % 1000;
            std::cout << A[i] << " ";           
        }
    std::cout << std::endl; //IT GOES AS FAR AS THIS
    std::cout << "The array has been analyzed; its' minimum is " << find_min_and_max(A).min << "and its' maximum is " << find_min_and_max(A).max << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
As a side note, you can use std:pair<int, int> to store both min and max values, instead of creating your own pair, also you can make typedef pair<int, int> min_and_max –  higuaro Oct 14 '13 at 20:21
    
Now the code runs properly, I can wonder about that: I have used std::pair in a previous version of this code, and then I somehow got the impression that a struct is faster. Is it really? –  Chiffa Oct 14 '13 at 20:24
2  
@Chiffa: std::pair is a struct almost identical to the one you used; also, the time used by your function is dominated by the loop looking for min/max, a difference in the return type is going to be negligible anyway. –  Matteo Italia Oct 14 '13 at 20:27
2  
it isn't it enough with a loop? int maxval = INT_MIN; int minval = INT_MAX; for (auto& i : A ) { maxval = std::max( maxval, i ); minval = std::min( minval, i ); } –  CyberSpock Oct 14 '13 at 20:31
2  
Your struct is same as std::pair but with better member names. –  Pete Becker Oct 14 '13 at 20:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted
 for(int i = 2; i < A.size(); (i + 2))

i + 2 won't change the value of i, you need to use i += 2.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, didn't really know how to write this increment properly. –  Chiffa Oct 14 '13 at 20:21
    
Normally we use i++ which compiler interprets as 2 things return i and also increment it. stackoverflow.com/questions/24853/… –  Nishant Oct 14 '13 at 20:36
2  
@Nishant i++ is used when you want to increment it by 1 and it would better be ++i. –  Zac Wrangler Oct 14 '13 at 20:44

The problem lies here:

for(int i = 2; i < A.size(); (i + 2))

You never actually increment i, thus causing an infinite loop.

change it to:

for(int i = 2; i < A.size(); i+=2)
share|improve this answer

Additional to the given answers, if you're using c++11 you can simplify your algorithm using lambdas and the std::for_each function:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>

int main() { 
    int array[] = { -8, 8, 0, 9, 5, -3, 4, 6, -1, 15, 31 };
    int min, max;
    // User std::for_each(v.begin(), v.end(), ...) for either vector or list
    std::for_each(std::begin(array), std::end(array), [&min, &max](int elem) { 
        max = std::max(max, elem);
        min = std::min(min, elem);
    });
    std::cout << min << ", " << max << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

And maybe it could be even simpler

Update: As @Blastfurnace pointed out, the std::minmax_element function could be used to further reduce the code needed for searching both the min and max element, yielding this shorter version:

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>   

int main() { 
    std::vector<int> values = { -8, 8, 0, 9, 5, -3, 4, 6, -1, 15, 31 };
    auto minAndMax = std::minmax_element(values.begin(), values.end());
    std::cout << *minAndMax.first << ", " << *minAndMax.second << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

Is important to note that everything done in this answer, besides being OT, is for the sake of learning, to give the OP alternatives to improve his (or her) work and help other users that could have the same requirement.

share|improve this answer
3  
If you are using C++11 it might make more sense to just use std::minmax_element –  Blastfurnace Oct 14 '13 at 21:00
    
As I, personally, like lambdas, I would probably use them. As for the std::minmax_element it deals with several equivalent elements in a manner I'm not sure I need for this particular code. –  Chiffa Oct 14 '13 at 21:08
2  
@Chiffa: I also think lambdas are fantastic but std::minmax_element performs a minimum number of comparisons, it's correct, and it's library code I don't have to reinvent. –  Blastfurnace Oct 14 '13 at 21:14
    
Well, thanks for mentioning it. –  Chiffa Oct 14 '13 at 21:58
    
About the update -- this is really educational, and I'll be steadily improving my solution. –  Chiffa Oct 15 '13 at 1:50

In any case the algorithm is incorrect because the vector can have the size equal to 0. In this case 1) you try to access alements that are not exist and 2) you return undefined values from the function. The more correct approach is to return indexes of the minimum and maximum elements and in the case if the vector is empty return a pair of A.size().

share|improve this answer
    
Indeed. I'll take care of that, thanks. –  Chiffa Oct 14 '13 at 20:51

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