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I have this class:

template <typename T, ::std::size_t M, ::std::size_t N>
struct matrix
{
private:
  union
  {
    T idata[M * N];
    T data[M][N];
  } u_;
};

I use the idata union member to initialize the matrix and the data member for access. The two arrays seem to overlap exactly in my use-case. Does the standard guarantee that this will always be the case? That is, that both u_.idata and u_.data will have the same starting address and the same size?

EDIT:

I use this constexpr constructor to initialize the matrix:

template <typename ...U>
constexpr matrix(U&&... args) : u_{{::std::forward<U>(args)...}}
{
}

Without the union I would have no way to initialize the matrix in a constexpr constructor.

share|improve this question
5  
It's a bit tricky. Both arrays are guaranteed to take up the same amount of space, but you're not allowed to read an inactive union member, and you're also not allowed to overstep an array bound. A compiler could detect the UB and just optimize your entire code away. – Kerrek SB Oct 14 '13 at 20:48
1  
Since "a pointer to a union, suitably converted, points to all of its members", I think it is guaranteed. However, you can't access one member of a union after writing to the other one, since that's undefined behavior. – user529758 Oct 14 '13 at 20:49
1  
@MatteoItalia: That wouldn't compile, since a is a T(*)[M], not a T*. At best you could have T * p = &a[0][0] and use p[i] (which is essentially what I was doing). – Kerrek SB Oct 14 '13 at 20:59
3  
If those arrays were layout-compatible, accessing through either of them would even be defined behaviour. If they had the same alignment requirements, that might even be the case in layman's terms. The Standard doesn't contain a definition of layout-compatible for arrays, as far as I can see. – dyp Oct 14 '13 at 21:05
1  
@KerrekSB: For int (*p)[N], yes (limited to the range 0..m). But int* p is not so limited, so can use any offset that lands in the same complete object. – Ben Voigt Oct 14 '13 at 21:12
up vote 6 down vote accepted

Without the union I would have no way to initialize the matrix in a constexpr constructor.

Actually, you could. You just have to stop thinking of the flat array as merely a workaround for construction.

This will work:

template <typename T, ::std::size_t M, ::std::size_t N>
struct matrix
{
  template <typename ...U> constexpr matrix(U&&... args);
private:
  T idata[M * N];
  constexpr T& data( size_t i, size_t j ) { return idata[i*N+j]; }

  // I'm sure the class has many other useful members but I'm not listing them
};

The compiler should generate the same code for that, too.

share|improve this answer
    
How so, since no private or protected non-static data members (Clause 11) for aggregates? This would be a limiting factor for me. – user1095108 Oct 14 '13 at 21:14
2  
@user: You're already violating that requirement. – Ben Voigt Oct 14 '13 at 21:16
    
I mean, you should not have provided any private members, or aggregate initialization will not work, as far as I understand. – user1095108 Oct 14 '13 at 21:23
1  
There's no limitation on having private members in a type that's constexpr-usable. matrix isn't an aggregate, its idata member is, and can be initialized in a constexpr constructor as you desired, using the technique you showed in your question. – Ben Voigt Oct 14 '13 at 21:41
    
@user: It was not intended to be a complete definition of the type, just the parts shown in your question. Your question had a constructor that wasn't declared in the class body. I did the same. I was only showing that data could be an inline function instead of a data member, without making any changes to your constexpr constructor. – Ben Voigt Oct 14 '13 at 21:43

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