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I am creating a store for user preferences, and there are a fixed number of preferences that users can set values for. The names of the preferences (settings) are stored as an Enum:

public enum UserSettingName {

    FOO,
    BAR,
    ETC

}

What I would like to be able to do is store a value type with the name so that the service will store the user's value with the correct Java type. For example, FOO might be a Long, and BAR might be a String. Up until now, we were storing all values as Strings, and then manually casting the values into the appropriate Java type. This has lead to try/catch blocks everywhere, when it makes more sense to have only one try/catch in the service. I understand that Enums cannot have generic types, so I have been playing around with:

public enum UserSettingName {

    FOO(Long.class),
    BAR(String.class),
    ETC(Baz.class)

    private Class type;

    private UserSettingName(Class type) {
        this.type = type;
    }

    public Class getType() {
        return this.type;
    }
}

I have a generic UserSetting object that has public T getSettingValue() and public void setSettingValue(T value) methods that should return and set the value with the correct type. My problem comes from trying to specify that generic type T when I create or retrieve a setting because I can't do something like:

new UserSetting<UserSettingName.FOO.getType()>(UserSettingName.FOO, 123L)

Sorry if this isn't exactly clear, I can try to clarify if it's not understood.

Thanks!

UPDATE

Both the setting name and value are coming in from a Spring MVC REST call:

public ResponseEntity<String> save(@PathVariable Long userId, @PathVariable UserSettingName settingName, @RequestBody String settingValue)

So I used the Enum because Spring casts the incoming data automatically.

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1  
How important is it for you to use enum? There is a fairly simple answer if you can use static final fields instead. –  StriplingWarrior Oct 14 '13 at 22:07
    
@StriplingWarrior it's not that important, but it reduces code because Spring MVC casts to the Enum automatically. I will add the code in my question –  Ben March Oct 14 '13 at 22:41

3 Answers 3

Firstly you have to step back and think about what you're trying to achieve, and use a standard pattern or language construct to achieve it.

It's not entirely clear what you're going after here but from your approach it almost certainly looks like you're reinventing something which could be done in a much more straightforward manner in Java. For example, if you really need to know and work with the runtime classes of objects, consider using the reflection API.

On a more practical level - what you're trying to do here isn't possible with generics. Generics are a compile-time language feature - they are useful for avoiding casting everything explicitly from Object and give you type-checking at compilation time. You simply cannot use generics in this way, i.e. setting T as some value UserSettingName.Foo.getType() which is only known at runtime.

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5  
I completely agree with this, and would furthermore like to add that enums shouldn't typically be used the way they are in the OP. Basically, an enum is a group of user-defined abstract (not in a coding sense) types, that should be used to differentiate between different scenarios. For example if you were to program your life, you may use an enum that contains the week days MONDAY through SUNDAY, which can then be used to figure out if you can sleep for as long as you wish or not. An even better example is using an enum to specify message types for a simple homemade (UDP) message parser. –  Izmaki Oct 14 '13 at 22:22

Look how it done by netty:

http://netty.io/wiki/new-and-noteworthy.html#type-safe-channeloption

They done it by using typed constants:

http://grepcode.com/file/repo1.maven.org/maven2/io.netty/netty-all/4.0.0.Beta1/io/netty/channel/ChannelOption.java#ChannelOption

EDIT:

public interface ChannelConfig {
   ...
   <T> boolean setOption(ChannelOption<T> option, T value);
   ...
}

public class ChannelOption<T> ...
    public static final ChannelOption<Integer> SO_TIMEOUT =
        new ChannelOption<Integer>("SO_TIMEOUT");
    ...
}

EDIT2: you can transform it like:

class Baz {}

class UserSettingName<T> {
    public static final UserSettingName<Baz> ETC = new UserSettingName<Baz>();
}

class UserSetting {
    public <T> UserSetting(UserSettingName<T> name, T param) {

    }
}

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new UserSetting(UserSettingName.ETC, new Baz());
    }
}
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1  
I don't see how your link answers the question. Could you explain? –  tom Oct 14 '13 at 22:05
1  
@tom: If it's possible to use static final fields instead of enums, then each value can have a generically-declared type associated with it, following the pattern you see in the ChannelOption class in the link he provided. –  StriplingWarrior Oct 14 '13 at 22:09
    
Can you add a relevant code sample for this answer? As is it's pretty much only a few links –  Chris Oct 14 '13 at 22:12
1  
I think this might work, let me try it out. –  Ben March Oct 14 '13 at 22:27
    
My only issue is that I won't know the type until runtime. So in your second edit, I would have to interpret the type based on a String and then look up the UserSettingName. The data is coming in from a REST call: public ResponseEntity<String> save(@PathVariable Long userId, @PathVariable UserSettingName settingName, @RequestBody String settingValue) This works with Spring because it casts the string to enum under the hood, but i would have to use a raw string with this. –  Ben March Oct 14 '13 at 22:38

Enums are not the answer here. If you find yourself repeating code everywhere you could just create a utility class and encapsulate all the try/catch logic there. That would cut down on your code redundancy without majorly impacting your current code.

public class Util
{
    public static MyObject getObjectFromString(String s)
    {
        try
        {
            return (MyObject)s;
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

Then use as follows:

MyObject myObj = Util.getObjectFromString(string);
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