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I'm implementing an algorithm which has to quickly decide whether a path exists between two cells in a 2D grid (for a maze-like game). It does not actually have to provide the path. This algorithm is run many thousands of times, so it must be fast.

The quirk is, the two cells are very close to each other (within a Manhattan distance of 2), so for most reasonable mazes, the path is often trivial. Right now I have pure breadth-first search, but I'm considering implementing a bidirectional variant. The problem is, of course, that in the cases a path does not exist, the bidirectional search will fail slower, because it searches two connected components instead of one, though if a path exists, it will find it faster (probably).

So my question is, does anyone have any experiences with bidirectional search and how it behaves in the cases mentioned above? Is the speed difference actually quite marginal?

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Do you mean bidirectional Dijkstra? –  Kunal Oct 14 '13 at 22:19
    
why don't you split the map into connected components so the search can fail quickly? –  Karoly Horvath Oct 14 '13 at 22:20
2  
Most questions of speed are best solved with benchmarking against a typical data set, unless you're worried more about worst-case than typical. –  Mark Ransom Oct 14 '13 at 22:20
    
I mean bidirectional breadth-first. In this case, the maze cannot be split into connected components in the general case because the maze is slightly different each time (a different cell is made non-passable each time). –  bombax Oct 14 '13 at 22:22
    
You're going to have to test it. The behavior is so domain-specific there's no way to answer your question. One observation is that A* with the trivial heuristic of Manhattan distance will do better than BFS in the "yes" case when there is a fairly direct path from start to finish. Certainly better than dumb BFS. Another note: you can offload BFS to a GPU quite nicely. See for example cs.utexas.edu/~pingali/CS395T/2013fa/papers/garlandGPU.pdf. –  Gene Oct 15 '13 at 0:44

2 Answers 2

the maze is slightly different each time (a different cell is made non-passable each time)

in that case you can often do better by saving you flood-fill (breadth first) distances.

consider a maze like this (from + to *)

XXXXXXX
X+   *X
X XXX X
X     X
XXXXXXX

which has flood fill distances

XXXXXXX
X+123*X
X1XXX7X
X23456X
XXXXXXX

blocking point Z gives

XXXXXXX
X+123*X
X1XXX7X
X23Z56X
XXXXXXX

and since the value at Z was 4, which is larger than the shortest path (3), you immediately know that Z does not affect the solution, with no further searching.

the other case, if you block at Y,

XXXXXXX
X+1Y3*X
X1XXX7X
X23456X
XXXXXXX

you know that any distance greater than 2 (the blocked value) is unreliable, and so you need to recalculate those points. in this case, that means repeating the search on the longer path. but that is no more expensive than you were doing anyway.

in short, if you are making small modifications, storing the flood-fill distances can save time (at the cost of memory).

this is only very general advice. i am not saying that it is always best to completely flood fill every cell when starting, for example. it may be that stopping on first success makes more sense, with further filling occurring later.

in other words, cache internal results during the search and be smart about invalidating the cache. then you can avoid the cost of duplicating work in areas of the maze that have not changed.

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The intuition that if no path exists, bidirectional search [1] does more job than unidirectional, does not generally hold. If your bidirectional algorithm is coded to alternate frequently between expanding nodes from forward and backward search (as it should do), there is a chance that bidirectional variant returns before the unidirectional does even in the case there is not path between source and target: Suppose that the input graph contains 2 components that are not connected, say, V and W; source node s belonging to V, target node belonging to W; |V| = 1000 and |W| = 10. Now the unidirectional search will have to expand all 1000 nodes before its priority queue runs empty. In bidirectional search, only 10 nodes from W and 10 nodes from V will be expanded, then it terminates.

[1] Java implementation

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