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(define fun3
  (lambda (item list) 
    (cond ((equal? item (car list))) 
          ((fun3 item (cdr list)))
          (else #f))))

I want to know what is wrong if I enter an element which is not in the list. There it show an error.--mcar: expects argument of type <mutable-pair>; given ()

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I enter (fun3 'w (list 'a 'b )) to execute this , But it show error as mentioned. Other wise if it found the element, then no error. –  Saurabh Khurana Oct 14 '13 at 22:59
    
Also see stackoverflow.com/q/664288/1281433. –  Joshua Taylor Oct 14 '13 at 23:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What happens when you get to the end of your list? A list like (1 2 3) is actually a chain of cons cells:

(1 2 3) == (1 . (2 . (3 . ())))

You get the thing on the left side of the . using car, and the thing on the right using cdr. Consider what happens when you search for 4 in (1 2 3) with your code:

(define fun3
  (lambda (item list) 
    (cond ((equal? item (car list))) 
          ((fun3 item (cdr list)))
          (else #f))))

Eventually you recurse to the case where item is (still) 4, and list is (3 . ()). Now, (fun3 item (cdr list)) will be called, and then item will (still) be 4, but list will be (). You can't call (car ()) because () isn't a cons cell. You need to explicitly check the case that list is the empty list:

(define fun3
  (lambda (item list) 
    (cond ((null? list) <...>)
          ((equal? item (car list))) 
          ((fun3 item (cdr list)))
          (else #f))))

Now, there are two things to note:

  1. This can be simplified significantly. Using some boolean logic, you could even get rid of the cond entirely (see Scheme, search if a word is a part of list for some ideas about how). The general point here is that you're doing something analogous to the C code

    if ( condition ) {
      return false;
    }
    else {
      return true;
    }
    

    which can be simplified greatly to return !condition;. Do you see how your code is similar to that? Particularly, your second case is (fun3 item (cdr list)). If it's true, then you return true. If it's false, then you go to the next case and… return false. This means you can simply return the value of (fun3 item (cdr list)).

  2. The more important issue is that you said you wanted to check whether item is an element of a list or any of its sublists, but your code right now (pending the fix about checking for the empty list) only checks whether item is a member of list, not any of its sublists. When item isn't equal to (car list), it could be because (car list) is another list, and you'll need to recurse into to and check whether item is in it. You might be helped by looking at search through nested list in scheme to find a number, but it won't tell you exactly how to do that.
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Thanks a lot buddy. Got my fault. Will keep in mind. –  Saurabh Khurana Oct 15 '13 at 0:14

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