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I found this code snippet that I believe converts an integer to hex. However, I'm not following it at all. I added the comments that say what I believe is happening, but I have no idea WHY it's being done. So, assuming I correctly noted what each line was doing, can someone please explain to me why it's being done? As in how it in any way helps convert to hex?

$a0 is the integer value

$a1 is the address of where the result should be

        addi $t0, $0, 48       #set $t0 equal to 48 
        sb $t0, 0($a1)         #store $to (48) at location 0 in $a1
        addi $t0, $0, 120      #set $t0 equal to 120
        sb $t0, 1($a1)         #store $t0 (120) at location 1 in $a1
        addi $t1, $a1, 9       #set $t1 = the address + 9

LOOP:

        andi $t0, $a0, 0xf    #$t0 = 1 if $a0 and 0xf are the same (0xf = beginning of hex)?

        slti $t2, $t0, 10     #if $t0 is less than 10, $t2 = 1, else 0
        bne $t2, $0,  DIGIT   #if $t2 does not equal 0, branch to DIGIT
        addi $t0, $t0, 48     #set $t0 equal to 48
        addi $t0, $t0, 39     #set $t0 equal to 39 (why did we just write over the 48?)
DIGIT:

        sb $t0, 0($t1)        #set $t0 equal to whatever's in location 0 of $t1

        srl $a0, $a0, 4       #shift right 4 bits

        bne $a0, $0, LOOP     #if $a0 does not equal 0, branch to LOOP
        addi $t1, $t1, -1     #set $t1 = $t1 - 1

DONE:

        jr $ra                #set the jump register back to $ra
        nop
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
    slti $t2, $t0, 10     #if $t0 is less than 10, $t2 = 1, else 0
    bne $t2, $0,  DIGIT   #if $t2 does not equal 0, branch to DIGIT
    addi $t0, $t0, 48     #set $t0 equal to 48
    addi $t0, $t0, 39     #set $t0 equal to 39 (why did we just write over the 48?)

MIPS uses branch delay slots, meaning that the instruction following the branch instruction always is executed before the branch is taken (or not taken).

So what this says is "If $t0 is less than 10 (i.e. in the range 0..9), goto DIGIT, but first add 48 (ASCII '0') regardless of the value of $t0. In case the branch was taken you'll now have converted from 0..9 to '0'..'9'. In case the branch wasn't taken, $t0 was originally in the range 10..15 and will now be in the range 58..63, so we add 39 more to get a value in the range 97..102 (the ASCII codes for 'a'..'f')".

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ohhh so he's converting it to ASCII and then the ASCII code goes into each individual digit? –  user2869231 Oct 15 '13 at 18:45
    
Sort of. The end result is a string, which is just an array of (ASCII) characters. –  Michael Oct 15 '13 at 19:44
    
Ah... I didn't realize hex was a string. Figured it was a number written in a different format. That definitely helps.. Thanks! –  user2869231 Oct 16 '13 at 4:58
    
Hexadecimal doesn't automatically mean a string. But conversion between different bases doesn't make much sense unless there's a textual representation involved. For plain numbers there's no difference (the values 20 and 0x14 are represented by exactly the same bit patterns). –  Michael Oct 16 '13 at 7:09

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