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I have a dataset I'm analyzing in pandas where all data is binned monthly. The data originates from a MySQL database where all dates are in the format 'YYYY-MM-01', such that, for example, all rows for October 2013 would have "2013-10-01" in the month column.

I'm currently reading the data into pandas (via a .tsv dump of the MySQL table) with

data = pd.read_table(filename,header=None,names=('uid','iid','artist','tag','date'),index_col=indexes, parse_dates='date') 

This is all fine, except for the fact that any subsequent analyses I run in which I do monthly resampling always represents dates using the end-of-month convention (i.e. data from October becomes '2013-10-31' instead of '2013-10-01'), but this can lead to inconsistencies where the original data has months labeled as 'YYYY-MM-01', while any resampled data will have the months labeled as 'YYYY-MM-31' (or '-30' or '-28', as appropriate).

My question is this: What is the easiest and/or fastest way I can convert all the dates in my dataframe to the end-of-month format from the outset? Keep in mind that the date is one of several indexes in a multi-index, not a column. I think my best bet is to use a modified date_parser in my in my pd.read_table call that always converts month to the end-of-month convention, but I'm not sure how to approach it.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

use replace() to change the day value. and you can get the last day of month using

from datetime import date
import calendar

d = date(2000,1,1)
d = d.replace(day=calendar.monthrange(d.year, d.month)[1])

UPDATE

I add some example for pandas.

sample file date.csv

2013-01-01, 1
2013-02-01, 2

ipython shell log.

In [27]: import pandas as pd

In [28]: from datetime import datetime, date

In [29]: import calendar

In [30]: def parse(dt):
             dt = datetime.strptime(dt, '%Y-%m-%d')
             dt = dt.replace(day=calendar.monthrange(dt.year, dt.month)[1])
             return dt.date()
             ....:

In [31]: parse('2013-01-01')
Out[31]: datetime.date(2013, 1, 31)

In [32]: r = pd.read_csv('date.csv', header=None, names=('date', 'value'), parse_dates=['date'], date_parser=parse)

In [33]: r
Out[33]:
         date  value
0  2013-01-31      1
1  2013-02-28      2
share|improve this answer
    
Possibly useful, but this doesn't say how to apply the transformation to the date index... – moustachio Oct 15 '13 at 1:32
    
@moustachio use custom date_parser. – EveryEvery Oct 15 '13 at 1:53
    
Perfect! Thank you for expanding the explanation, this works perfectly. My comment was on your first version of the answer. – moustachio Oct 15 '13 at 2:52

Read your dates in exactly like you are doing.

Create some test data. I am setting the dates to the start of month, but it doesn't matter.

In [39]: df = DataFrame(np.random.randn(10,2),columns=list('AB'),
                        index=date_range('20130101',periods=10,freq='MS'))

In [40]: df
Out[40]: 
                   A         B
2013-01-01 -0.553482  0.049128
2013-02-01  0.337975 -0.035897
2013-03-01 -0.394849 -1.755323
2013-04-01 -0.555638  1.903388
2013-05-01 -0.087752  1.551916
2013-06-01  1.000943 -0.361248
2013-07-01 -1.855171 -2.215276
2013-08-01 -0.582643  1.661696
2013-09-01  0.501061 -1.455171
2013-10-01  1.343630 -2.008060

Force convert them to the end-of-month in time space regardless of the day

In [41]: df.index = df.index.to_period().to_timestamp('M')

In [42]: df
Out[42]: 
                   A         B
2013-01-31 -0.553482  0.049128
2013-02-28  0.337975 -0.035897
2013-03-31 -0.394849 -1.755323
2013-04-30 -0.555638  1.903388
2013-05-31 -0.087752  1.551916
2013-06-30  1.000943 -0.361248
2013-07-31 -1.855171 -2.215276
2013-08-31 -0.582643  1.661696
2013-09-30  0.501061 -1.455171
2013-10-31  1.343630 -2.008060

Back to the start

In [43]: df.index = df.index.to_period().to_timestamp('MS')

In [44]: df
Out[44]: 
                   A         B
2013-01-01 -0.553482  0.049128
2013-02-01  0.337975 -0.035897
2013-03-01 -0.394849 -1.755323
2013-04-01 -0.555638  1.903388
2013-05-01 -0.087752  1.551916
2013-06-01  1.000943 -0.361248
2013-07-01 -1.855171 -2.215276
2013-08-01 -0.582643  1.661696
2013-09-01  0.501061 -1.455171
2013-10-01  1.343630 -2.008060

You can also work with (and resample) as periods

In [45]: df.index = df.index.to_period()

In [46]: df
Out[46]: 
                A         B
2013-01 -0.553482  0.049128
2013-02  0.337975 -0.035897
2013-03 -0.394849 -1.755323
2013-04 -0.555638  1.903388
2013-05 -0.087752  1.551916
2013-06  1.000943 -0.361248
2013-07 -1.855171 -2.215276
2013-08 -0.582643  1.661696
2013-09  0.501061 -1.455171
2013-10  1.343630 -2.008060
share|improve this answer
    
That freq='MS' is exactly what I've been looking for! If I use that for reindexing/filling purposes, I don't need to mess with the custom date_parser. – moustachio Oct 15 '13 at 14:50

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