Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm learning Unity3d + some basic maths I've forgotten by messing around.
Heres what I'm doing now..

As you can probably tell the sides of this shape form a parabola. The distance they are out from the centre is the base radius + the height squared * by a constant (0.05 in this image)

The code generating this is very simple..

for (int changer = 1; changer > -2; changer-=2) {

        Vector3 newPos = new Vector3(
             transform.position.x
            ,transform.position.y + currentheight*changer
            ,transform.position.z - RadiusAtZero -(Mathf.Pow(currentheight,2)*CurveMultiplier)
            );

        var newFleck = Instantiate(Fleck, newPos, Quaternion.identity)as GameObject;
        newFleck.transform.RotateAround(transform.position,Vector3.up,angle*changer);

        FleckList.Add(newFleck );

        }

Btw the for loop and 'changer' mirror everything so 'currentheight' is really just the distance from the centreline of the parabola.

Anyway I'd like to make the cubes (or flecks as I've called them) be angled so that they are tangentional to the parabola I have made.
I need to determine the angle of a tangent to the parabola at particular point.
I found this

to find the line tangent to y=x^2 -3 at (1, -2) we can simultaneously solve y=x^2 -3 and y+2=m(x-1) and set the discriminant equal to zero

But I dont know how to implement this. Also I reckon my 'CurveMultiplier' constant makes my parabola equation different from that one.
Can someone write some code that determines the angle? (and also maybe explain it)

Update. Here is fixed version using the derivative of the equation. (Also I have changed from boxes to tetrahedrons and few other superficial things) enter image description here

share|improve this question
1  
That link points to a method for finding the tangent line without using calculus. But in this case, why not just use the derivative of the parabola function? The derivative y' = 2*x gives you exactly the slope at x. –  lurker Oct 15 '13 at 2:03
    
Aaaahh whats a derivative!!? soz. Can u explain that? whats that apostrophe after y? –  Guye Incognito Oct 15 '13 at 2:05
2  
Sorry, I wasn't sure if you were familiar with the Calculus or not. A derivative is the infinitesimal rate of change of a function at a given point. That's the same thing as the slope of the function at that point. The "apostrophe" is one type of notation to indicate the derivative of a function of y = f(x) (written as y' or f'(x) or dy/dx etc). The value of y' at a given x, or f'(x) is the slope of f(x) at that point. –  lurker Oct 15 '13 at 2:07
    
So in my case.. would the angle be twice the Y value (my parabola is going sideways compared to the examples I'm seeing) Is that angle in radians? Also will that constant I'm scaling the z axis with make a difference, thanks! –  Guye Incognito Oct 15 '13 at 2:14
1  
In your picture then I'll assume Y is vertical, X horizontal, and Z in/out of the screen. Then the parabola is x = 0.05*h^2 + R (h is height, R is base radius). If you imagine a plane containing the Y axis, you can rotate the plane around the Y axis at any angle and the dual parabola looks the same. The slope of the tangent of that parabola in that plane is 0.1*h for a given value of h. Since the plane has an angle relative to X and Z axes, then that tangent will also have the same angular component. –  lurker Oct 15 '13 at 2:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The easiest solution is to use a derivative for the parabolic equation.

In your picture then I'll assume Y is vertical, X horizontal, and Z in/out of the screen. Then the parabola being rotated, based upon your description, is:

f(h) = 0.05*h^2 + R

(h is height, R is base radius). If you imagine a plane containing the Y axis, you can rotate the plane around the Y axis at any angle and the dual parabola looks the same.

The derivative of a parabolic equation of the form f(x) = C*h^2 + R is f'(x) = 2*C*h, which is the slope of the tangent at h. In this specific case, that would be:

f'(h) = 0.1*h

Since the cross-sectional plane has an angle relative to X and Z axes, then that tangent will also have the same angular component (you have a rotated parabola).

Depending upon the units given for the constants in f(h), particularly the 0.05 value, you may have to adjust this for the correct results.

share|improve this answer
    
OK! I actually was confused by this for aages! I thought your solution would give me the angle of the tangent (like in radians) but it actually gives me the slope (like a ratio) duh! –  Guye Incognito Oct 16 '13 at 23:10
    
Actually that doesnt seem right either. The values I get for –  Guye Incognito Oct 16 '13 at 23:27
    
Actually that doesnt work either. The values I'm getting for h*my constant*2 start at 1.2 in the centre of the parabola and increase to 12 as you go out. –  Guye Incognito Oct 16 '13 at 23:33
    
Ok! I seems to work perfectly now. I was using the traditional height (my Z value). When use the Y value it seems prefect. so Y*constant*2 –  Guye Incognito Oct 17 '13 at 0:30
    
Thats great @GuyeIncognito. I may not have had my coordinate names correct per your usage, so it sounds like you have it all aligned. –  lurker Oct 17 '13 at 2:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.