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Following a tutorial on treehouse, I'm see this popular Object-C warning message in XCode.

My button function

- (IBAction)buttonPressed:(UIButton *)sender {
    NSUInteger index = arc4random_uniform(predictionArray.count);
    self.predictionLabel.text = [predictionArray objectAtIndex:index];
}

I see it on the NSUInteger line, I've few a few of the similar stackoverflows and they seem to talk about 32bit vs 64bit numbers and type casting, but not sure how to do that here?

My predictionArray

- (void)viewDidLoad
{
    [super viewDidLoad];
    predictionArray = [[NSArray alloc] initWithObjects:
                   @"It is certain", @"It is decidely so", @"All signs say YES", @"The stars are not aligned",
                   @"My reply is no",
                   @"It is doubtful",
                   @"Better not tell you now",
                   @"Concentrate and ask again",
                   @"Unable to answer now", nil];
// Do any additional setup after loading the view, typically from a nib.
}

enter image description here

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2 Answers

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You can safely suppress the warning with a cast.

NSUInteger index = arc4random_uniform((uint32_t) predictionArray.count);

It's not always safe to suppress warnings, so don't go casting things to get rid of the warnings until you figure out whether the operation is safe.

What's going on here is that NSUInteger is, on your platform, a typedef for a 64-bit integer type. It's not always 64 bits, just on some platforms. The compiler is warning you that some of those bits are getting thrown away. If you know that these bits are unimportant, you can just use a cast.

In this case, the result is that index will always be under 232-1. If it's even remotely possible for predictionArray to contain 232 or more elements, then your program has an error and you'll have to construct a 64-bit version of arc4random_uniform(). You can ensure this with the following code:

assert(predictionArray.count <= (uint32_t) -1);
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Hmm, I just tried this, but still the same warning. So what am I casting NSUInteger as? What does (NSUInteger) mean. Or maybe more importantly, what is it warning me about? –  Leon Gaban Oct 15 '13 at 2:30
    
@LeonGaban: I put the cast in the wrong place. –  Dietrich Epp Oct 15 '13 at 2:31
    
Thanks! Still trying to understand this, so NSUInteger is always a 32 bit int? I tried to cast it as a 64 bit and got the same error. That bit stuff is new to me, never had to run into it before –  Leon Gaban Oct 15 '13 at 2:38
3  
Deitrich, I don't want to edit your answer and step on toes, but I'd maybe expand it to explain why the cast is necessary. @LeonGaban arc4random_uniform() takes in, and returns, a uint32_t, an unsigned integer that is always 32 bits, regardless of target architecture. However, predictionArray.count returns an NSUInteger, which is typedefd differently for 32-bit and 64-bit systems; it's 32 bits on a 32-bit system, and 64-bits on a 64-bit system. If you're running on a 64-bit system, passing in a 64-bit NSUInteger will cause the compiler to complain that you're throwing away bits. –  Itai Ferber Oct 15 '13 at 5:13
4  
That wasn't my intent. You'd already gotten an upvote and Leon marked your answer as correct — just leaving a comment (1) would leave your answer as the canonical one, even if it was incomplete and my comment was valid. (2) Some people take extreme offense at having their answers forcibly edited, and I have no intention of offending anyone. (3) If your answer was already marked as correct, from experience, even if I'd put up a more complete answer, the asker would likely ignore it anyway. (4) So I chose to politely recommend you expand your answer. That's all. –  Itai Ferber Oct 15 '13 at 6:40
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As per my comment, arc4random_uniform() takes in, and returns, a u_int32_t, an unsigned integer that is always 32 bits, regardless of target architecture. However, predictionArray.count returns an NSUInteger, which is typedefd differently for 32-bit and 64-bit systems; it's 32 bits (unsigned int) on a 32-bit system, and 64-bits (unsigned long) on a 64-bit system. If you're running on a 64-bit system, passing in a 64-bit NSUInteger to a function expecting a 32-bit integer will cause the compiler to complain that you're throwing away bits.

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Thanks for the explanation, so if I send a 32 bit number into a 64 bit function/method does that slow down the program? Or is it just saying I could be more efficient. Is there a 64bit version of arc4random_uniform()? Or should I just use u_int32_t a lot? –  Leon Gaban Oct 15 '13 at 14:23
1  
@LeonGaban An unnoticeable amount, if at all. Your 32-bit number has to get extended to become 64-bits; if it's unsigned, then it will automatically become extended with 0s, and if it's signed and negative, it will get extended with 1s. It's not really an issue. However, if you try to pass in a 64-bit number into a 32-bit function, parts of your number can get thrown out (the function only gets the lower 32 bits), and the compiler complains (which is why you have to assure it that you know what you're doing with a cast). –  Itai Ferber Oct 15 '13 at 15:06
    
@LeonGaban Unfortunately, there's no 64-bit version of the arc4random* functions, but keep casting into them and you'll be alright. I recommend against using u_int32_t everywhere because it is, by definition, 32-bits. NSUInteger has the advantage of being typedefd for you by Apple to match the target platform, so you can always use it and know that you're doing things efficiently (you don't want to arbitrarily limit the size of your data unless it makes sense and is necessary). –  Itai Ferber Oct 15 '13 at 15:08
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