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I am writing a Chess program in Python that needs to generate all the moves of a knight. For those not familiar with chess, a knight moves in an L shape.

So, given a position of (2, 4) a knight could move to (0, 3), (0, 5), (1, 2), (3, 2), etc. for a total of (at most) eight different moves.

I want to write a function called knight_moves that generates these tuples in a list. What is the easiest way to do this in Python?

def knight_moves(position):
    ''' Returns a list of new positions given a knight's current position. '''
    pass
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5 Answers 5

Why not store the relative pairs it can move in ? So take your starting point, and add a set of possible moves away from it, you then would just need a sanity check to make sure they are still in bounds, or not on another piece.

ie given your (2, 4) starting point, the options are (-2,-1), (-2,+1), (-1,+2), (+2,+1) The relative positions would thus always be the same.

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Thanks, I came up with an answer thanks to this suggestion. –  sdasdadas Oct 15 '13 at 3:13

Not familiar with chess...

deltas = [(-2, -1), (-2, +1), (+2, -1), (+2, +1), (-1, -2), (-1, +2), (+1, -2), (+1, +2)]
def knight_moves(position):
    valid_position = lambda (x, y): x >= 0 and y >= 0 and ???
    return filter(valid_position, map(lambda (x, y): (position[0] + x, position[1] + y), deltas))
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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Ok, so thanks to Niall Byrne, I came up with this:

from itertools import product
def knight_moves(position):
    x, y = position
    moves = list(product([x-1, x+1],[y-1, y+1])) + list(product([x-2,x+2],[y-1,y+1]))
    moves = [(x,y) for x,y in moves if x >= 0 and y >= 0 and x < 8 and y < 8]
    return moves
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there is possibility to reduce this code using lambda, map and filter –  DevC Jan 9 at 6:23

Here's an easy implementation:

def knights_moves():
  a = []
  b = (1, 2)
  while 1:
    a.append(b)
    b = (-b[0], b[1])
    a.append(b)
    b = (b[1], b[0])
    if b in a:
      return a

[(1, 2), (-1, 2), (2, -1), (-2, -1), (-1, -2), (1, -2), (-2, 1), (2, 1)]

From there you can just simply add the current position to every member of this list, and then double check for validity.

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Completing xiaowl's answer,

possible_places = [(-2, -1), (-2, +1), (+2, -1), (+2, +1), (-1, -2), (-1, +2), (+1, -2), (+1, +2)]
def knight_moves(cur_pos):
    onboard = lambda (x, y): x >= 0 and y >= 0 and x<8 and y<8
    eval_move = lambda(x,y): (cur_pos[0] + x, cur_pos[1] + y)
    return filter(onboard, map(eval_move, possible_places))
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