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In my project there is an audio thread updating with about 86 fps and a graphics thread which runs at 60 fps. Both threads can produce and consume values from each other.

But it is not necessary to consume every value, only the latest one is important and no notification is required because the threads just ask for a new value when they need one.

After reading tons of websites about threading I am a bit confused what I really need, because my task is quite simple. With locks my code would look like:

private T aField; //memory location

//other thread reads value
public void ReadValue(ref T val)
{
    lock(myLock) copy aField to val;
}

//this thread updates value
private void UpdateValue(T newVal)
{
    lock(myLock) copy newVal to aField;
} 

My first question is, would this work for primitive types like float or int (<=32bit of size) without any lock because the copy is only one assignment which is atomic?

The next idea was a protection by a bool:

private T aField; //memory location
private volatile bool isReading;
private volatile bool isWriting;

//other thread reads value
public void ReadValue(ref T val)
{
    isReading = true;
    if(!isWriting) copy aField to val;
    isReading = false;
}

//this thread updates value
private void UpdateValue(T newVal)
{
    isWriting = true;
    if(!isReading) copy newVal to aField;
    isWriting = false;
}

Looks good to me but i am pretty sure i missed something. I could think of a worst case scenario when the faster thread reads while the slow thread wants to write. then the fast thread will read again the older value the next time, because no update was done.

What i also found was a nonblocking update method, but i wonder if and how it can help me:

static void LockFreeUpdate<T> (ref T field, Func <T, T> updateFunction)
  where T : class
{
  var spinWait = new SpinWait();
  while (true)
  {
    T snapshot1 = field;
    T calc = updateFunction (snapshot1);
    T snapshot2 = Interlocked.CompareExchange (ref field, calc, snapshot1);
    if (snapshot1 == snapshot2) return;
    spinWait.SpinOnce();
  }
}

What is the most efficient method with the lowest latency?

share|improve this question
    
Your bool protection method creates way more problems than it solves. –  David Schwartz Oct 15 '13 at 3:20
    
@DavidSchwartz could you give me some details or point me to an example? –  thalm Oct 15 '13 at 3:23
    
@thalm main problem that if conditions in both functions are false - neither update, nor read will occur, so you probably mean while - but in this case you can have deadloack, when both isreading and iswriting are true –  Lashane Oct 15 '13 at 3:25
    
ok, i can see the problem with both booleans are true, then nothing happens, which is ok in my case. but how can both booleans be false in the same time when both threads evaluate the if statement? –  thalm Oct 15 '13 at 3:55
1  
So if the lock took 50 ns (on modern hardware it's much less--closer to 10 ns), then 1,000 calls for every frame at 86 fps, you're talking 4 milliseconds. That's worst case. And a SpinLock would be even cheaper. For atomic types (references, and 32-bit primitive types on 32-bit hardware, 64 and 32-bit primitive types on 64 bit hardware), you don't need the lock although then you have to be careful about compiler optimizations. For larger types you definitely need the lock. –  Jim Mischel Oct 15 '13 at 18:46

1 Answer 1

for your case you do not need any locks, just add volatile to private T aField; to prevent any possible compiler optimizations

share|improve this answer
    
But what happens if T is a more complex type or an array? The copy methods are critical here i think... –  thalm Oct 15 '13 at 3:21
1  
@thalm for complex types you need to go with any kind of locks, either explicit via lock or via spinwait as you described in 3rd option –  Lashane Oct 15 '13 at 3:23
    
@thalm If it's an array it's okay (as long as the array is placed in the read section only after it's fully populated and not modified) - reading/writing a reference is atomic IIRC. –  NPSF3000 Oct 15 '13 at 3:25

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