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If you have

$str1 = "h*llo";
$str2 = "hello";

is it possible to quickly compare them without first having to remove the * from str1, and the matching indexed character from str2?

The solution would need to work regardless of how many * are in the string, eg:

$str1 = "h*l*o";
$str2 = "hello";

Thanks for taking a look.

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1  
You are looking for fnmatch(). –  mario Oct 15 '13 at 3:17
    
possible duplicate of php string matching with wildcard *? –  mario Oct 15 '13 at 3:19
    
@mario Didn't know about that function! Probably a more complete/faster/better overall method than using regular expressions. –  John V. Oct 15 '13 at 3:19
    
Thank guys - fnmatch examples don't seem to be working. I'll check if it's available on my server. –  Shaun Oct 15 '13 at 6:51
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, with regex, and more specifically preg_match for PHP. What you are looking for are "wildcards".

This is untested but should work for you:

$str1 = "h*llo";
$str2 = "hello";

//periods are a wildcards in regex
if(preg_match("/" . preg_quote(str_replace("*", ".*", $str1), "/") . "/", $str2)){
    echo "Match!";
} else {
    echo "No match";
}

EDIT: This should work for your case:

$str1 = "M<ter";
$str2 = "Moter";

//periods are a wildcards in regex
if(preg_match("/" . str_replace("\<", ".*", preg_quote($str1, "/")) . "/", $str2)){
    echo "Match!";
} else {
    echo "No match";
}
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1  
That's what I'd prefer still. +1 for thinking about preg_quote. Though replace * with .* to match multiple chars. –  mario Oct 15 '13 at 3:23
    
Thanks for the .* suggestion, I'm not that great at regex. –  John V. Oct 15 '13 at 3:24
    
Perhaps I should have not used the wildcard symbol. My text has the character "<" in the place of any punctuation and accents, and now I need to compare the strings. eg "M<ter" to "Motor" (lame example). –  Shaun Oct 15 '13 at 6:59
    
@Shaun Just change str_replace("*" to str_replace("<" –  John V. Oct 15 '13 at 7:14
    
Hi John. The example you've given gives "no match". Should it be a match? –  Shaun Oct 15 '13 at 7:48
show 6 more comments

You can use similar_text() to compare two strings and accept if the result is above e.g. 80%.

 similar_text($str1, $str2, $percent); 

Example:

$str1 = 'AAA';
$str1 = '99999';

similar_text($str1, $str2, $percent); 
echo $percent; // e.g. 0.000

$str1 = "h*llo";
$str2 = "hello";

similar_text($str1, $str2, $percent); 
echo $percent; // e.g. 95.000

See more here PHP SIMILAR TEXT

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Out of curiosity, why 80%? –  John V. Oct 15 '13 at 3:28
1  
it is just for the example, i've corrected it, thanks –  CIRCLE Oct 15 '13 at 3:33
    
I like this answer, and it would work for most things, but it's not as accurate as a method that uses actual wildcards, like fnmatch() or regex. –  John V. Oct 15 '13 at 3:39
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