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I have a written a small utility in D to convert the output of find -print0 to printf %b format. Such a utility already exists (nul2pfb from http://www.dwheeler.com/essays/filenames-in-shell.html), but the link is dead and I could not find the program, so I decided to implement it myself in D. I am using the following zsh command for testing:

diff <(find) <(for i in "$(find -print0 | dd | char2code)"; do printf '%b\n' "$i"; done)

The expected output is empty, but I find that some filenames that include a hyphen are handled wrong.

My source code is this:

import std.stdio;
import std.conv;
import std.ascii;
import std.c.stdlib;

void main()
  {
    foreach (ubyte[] mybuff; chunks(stdin, 4096)) {
    encodeline (mybuff);
  }
}

@safe void encodeline (ubyte[] mybuff) {
  // char[] outstring;
  foreach (ubyte i; mybuff) {
    char b = to!char(i);
    switch (i) {
      case 'a': .. case 'z':
      case 'A': .. case 'Z':
      case '0': .. case '9':
      case '/':
      case '.':
      case '_':
      case ':': writeChar(b); break;
      default: writeOctal(b); break;
      case 0: writeChar ('\n'); break;
      case '\\': writeString(`\\`); break;
      case '\t': writeString(`\t`); break;
      case '\n': writeString(`\n`); break;
      case '\r': writeString(`\r`); break;
      case '\f': writeString(`\f`); break;
      case '\v': writeString(`\v`); break;
      case '\a': writeString(`\a`); break;
      case '\b': writeString(`\b`); break;
    }
  }
  // writeString (outstring);
}

@trusted void writeString (string a)
{
  write (a);
}

@trusted void writeOctal (int a)
{
  try
  {
    writef ("\\%.#o", a); // leading 0 needed for for zsh printf '%b'
  }
  catch (std.format.FormatException b)
  {
    write ("Format exception in function writeOctal");
    throw b;
  }
}

@trusted void writeChar (char a)
{
  try
  {
    write (a);
  }
  catch (std.format.FormatException b)
  {
    write ("Format exception in function writeChar");
    throw b;
  }
}

@trusted void writeNewline ()
{
  writeln;
}

Here is a part of the diff output:

Correct filenames:
./.ibam/profile-004-battery
./.ibam/profile-034-charge
./.ibam/profile-054-charge
./.ibam/profile-045-battery
(a bunch of lines skipped)
---
Wrong filenames:
./.ibam/profileh04-battery
./.ibam/profileh34-charge
./.ibam/profileh54-charge
./.ibam/profileh45-battery

It seems like -0 is being replaced by h.

UPDATE: Replacing .# with .4 in the conversion specifier for writef fixed the problem but I still see differences in output of searches through /proc. However, this is also true when I do (as root)

diff <(find / print) <(find / print) > (myhomedirectory)/log.txt

so I have chosen to ignore it.

share|improve this question
    
The program seems to work correctly here. Could you provide an example of a problematic filename? – CyberShadow Oct 15 '13 at 6:20
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As it turned out, the problem was that whenever an octal escape sequence was followed by a number between 0 and 7 inclusive, and the original escape sequence was not already 4 octal digits long, the number became part of the octal escape sequence, causing printf %b to produce incorrect output. This was fixed by replacing the # by .4 in the conversion specifier in the D program.

This is the corrected source code, with some unneeded functions deleted:

import std.stdio;
import std.conv;
import std.ascii;
import std.c.stdlib;

void main()
  {
    foreach (ubyte[] mybuff; chunks(stdin, 4096)) {
    encodeline (mybuff);
  }
}

@safe void encodeline (ubyte[] mybuff) {
  // char[] outstring;
  foreach (ubyte i; mybuff) {
    char b = to!char(i);
    switch (i) {
      case 'a': .. case 'z':
      case 'A': .. case 'Z':
      case '0': .. case '9':
      case '/':
      case '.':
      case '_':
      case ':': writeChar(b); break;
      default: writeOctal(b); break;
      case 0: writeChar ('\n'); break;
      case '\\': writeString(`\\`); break;
      case '\t': writeString(`\t`); break;
      case '\n': writeString(`\n`); break;
      case '\r': writeString(`\r`); break;
      case '\f': writeString(`\f`); break;
      case '\v': writeString(`\v`); break;
      case '\a': writeString(`\a`); break;
      case '\b': writeString(`\b`); break;
    }
  }
}

@trusted void writeString (string a)
{
  write (a);
}

@trusted void writeOctal (int a)
{
  writef ("\\%.4o", a); // leading 0 needed for for zsh printf '%b'
}

@trusted void writeChar (char a)
{
  write (a);
}
share|improve this answer

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