Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wanted to find out the trade off point between a Dictionary lookup and a binary search lookup of an array. I was expecting constant time lookups for the Dictionary, and logarithmic time lookups for the binary search depending on the size of the collection, with the binary search performing better for smaller sized collections.

However, I was surprised when I saw the following results: Binary search growing exponentially, and hash lookup growing slowly

I was surprised at: 1. Binary search is growing logarithmically at first, and then grows much faster. 2. Hash is pretty consistent at first, but then also starts growing slowly. 3. Binary search is never better than the hash lookup. Below is my code. What did I do wrong?

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var r = new Random();
        var targets = Enumerable.Range(0, 1000 * 1000).Select(_ => r.Next(int.MaxValue)).ToList();

        for (int totalCount = 1; totalCount < 1000*1000*10; totalCount*=2)
        {
            var a = Enumerable.Range(0, totalCount).Select(_ => r.Next(int.MaxValue)).Distinct().Select(v => new thing(v)).OrderBy(t => t.value).ToArray();
            var d = a.ToDictionary(t => t.value);

            var watch = new System.Diagnostics.Stopwatch();

            {
                watch.Start();
                var found = targets.Select(t => BinarySearch(t, a)).Where(t => t != null).Count();
                watch.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine(string.Format("found {0} things out of {2} in {1} ms with binary search", found, watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, a.Length));
            }
            {
                watch.Restart();
                var found =  targets.Select(t => HashSearch(t, d)).Where(t => t != null).Count();
                watch.Stop();
                Console.WriteLine(string.Format("found {0} things out of {2} in {1} ms with hash search", found, watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, d.Keys.Count));
            }
        }
        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static thing HashSearch(int needle, Dictionary<int, thing> hash)
    {
        if (!hash.ContainsKey(needle))
            return null;
        return hash[needle];
    }

    static thing BinarySearch(int needle, thing[] sortedHaystack)
    {
        return BinarySearch(needle, sortedHaystack, 0, sortedHaystack.Length - 1);
    }
    static thing BinarySearch(int needle, thing[] sortedHaystack, int minimum, int maximum)
    {
        if (minimum > maximum)
            return null;
        var middle = (minimum + maximum) / 2;
        if (needle == sortedHaystack[middle].value)
            return sortedHaystack[middle];
        if (needle < sortedHaystack[middle].value)
            return BinarySearch(needle, sortedHaystack, minimum, middle - 1);
        return BinarySearch(needle, sortedHaystack, middle + 1, maximum);
    }

    class thing
    {
        public int value;
        public thing(int v)
        {
            value = v;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
What's surprising you, exactly? The fact that the dictionary search isn't perfectly constant? Or the fact that the dictionary wins even for small collections? Note that by iterating over a large list, you'll end up with a lot of cache misses just for the iteration. –  Jon Skeet Oct 15 '13 at 5:57
    
@JonSkeet Good point. I've clarified my question with what's surprising to me. –  John Tseng Oct 15 '13 at 5:59
1  
I wouldn't say that binary search is growing exponentially - at least, it's not obviously doing so, given that your x axis is a log axis. Plot it against a linear x axis and it may well be significantly clearer. The rest may be explained just through cache misses, to be honest - the bigger the collection, the more cache misses you'll get even with a notionally constant-time lookup. –  Jon Skeet Oct 15 '13 at 6:02
    
(To put it another way: the time complexity calculations of these lookups generally assume that each memory read is equally costly. That's not the case when some reads miss the cache and others don't.) –  Jon Skeet Oct 15 '13 at 6:04
    
@JonSkeet you're way too fast. I fixed the the exponential part right after my comment. The caching issue would explain why both algorithms start slowing down around the same point. –  John Tseng Oct 15 '13 at 6:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

(Pretty much as noted in comments.)

I suspect you're mostly seeing the effects of cache misses. When the collection is large, you'll get a lot of cache misses - particularly with the binary search, which potentially needs to touch a lot of points in the collection to find an element.

At the low sizes, I suspect you're seeing cache misses too, but this time on your targets list - and also the overhead of LINQ itself. LINQ is fast, but it can still be significant when all you're doing is performing a single search of a tiny collection in the middle.

I'd suggest rewriting your loops to something like:

{
    // Use the same seed each time for consistency. Doesn't have to be 0.
    Random random = new Random(0);
    watch.Start();
    int found = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 1000 * 1000; i++)
    {
        if (BinarySearch(t, random.Next(int.MaxValue)) != null)
        {
            found++;
        }
    }
    watch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine(string.Format
         "found {0} things out of {2} in {1} ms with binary search",
         found, watch.ElapsedMilliseconds, a.Length));
}

Of course you've then got the problem of including random number generation in the loop instead... you might want to look at using a random number generator which is faster than System.Random if you can find one. Or use some other way of determining which elements to look up.

Oh, and I'd personally rewrite the binary search to use iteration rather than recursion, but that's a different matter. I wouldn't expect it to have a significant effect.

share|improve this answer
    
As you predicted, iterative binary search did not have a significant effect. –  John Tseng Oct 15 '13 at 6:53

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.