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I have a loop on the server ( C# ) that does this:

for(i=0;i<=Request.Files.Count - 1; i++)
{
   // tell the client that the upload is about to happen
   // and report useful information
   Update(percent, message, i, 0);

   System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000);

   // tell the client that upload succeeded
   // and report useful information
   Update(percent, message, i, 1);

}

The function "Update" writes to the client-side javascript function "PublishUpdate". The row parameter is the row in the table containing the uploading file. The 'status' tells us if the file is about to be uploaded (0) or completed (1).

THE PROBLEM is that I can't seem to get the count correct. The loop seems to start 2 or 3 rows into the table or (after playing with the row value) it ends before the final row. I am very new to jQuery. Does anything look obviously wrong to you?

    function PublishUpdate(percent, message, row, status) 
    {
       var bodyRows = $("#picTableDisplay tbody tr");

           bodyRows.each(function(index){
               if (index == row && status == 0)                
                $('#status'+index).html("<img alt='inproc' src='images/loading.gif' />");
               else if (index == row && status == 1)
                $('#status'+index).html("complete");

    });

}

Finally, the table looks like this:

<table width="100%" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="3" border="0" align="center" id="picTableDisplay" summary="" class="x-pinfo-table">
                        <tbody id="files_list" class="scrollContent">
                            <tr class="evenRow">
                                <td class="numCol" id="num0">
                                </td>
                                <td class="fnameCol" id="fname0">
                                </td>
                                <td class="statusCol" nowrap="" id="status0">
                                </td>
                                <td class="remCol" id="rem0">
                                </td>
                            </tr>
                            <tr class="oddRow">
                                <td class="numCol" id="num1">
                                </td>
                                <td class="fnameCol" id="fname1">
                                </td>
                                <td class="statusCol" nowrap="" id="status1">
                                </td>
                                <td class="remCol" id="rem1">
                                </td>
                            </tr>
                            <tr class="evenRow">
                                <td class="numCol" id="num2">
                                </td>
                                <td class="fnameCol" id="fname2">
                                </td>
                                <td class="statusCol" nowrap="" id="status2">
                                </td>
                                <td class="remCol" id="rem2">
                                </td>
                            </tr>
                            AND SO ON ...

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Why is there a ); after the closing curly bracket? –  kiamlaluno Dec 20 '09 at 23:06
    
To finish the .each( –  Rich Dec 20 '09 at 23:07
    
But the final } is missing! –  Rich Dec 20 '09 at 23:08
    
yes, sorry. I cut and paste and missed the "}". Have done the update, thanks. –  Code Sherpa Dec 21 '09 at 3:44
    
If you really want to use IDs rather than just row numbers it would be cleaner to give the row itself an ID and then refer to the cells as $('#row2 .fnameCol') or whatever. –  Rich Dec 21 '09 at 7:45
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The C# is using zero indexing, and typically HTML authors use indexing starting from one. Check to see if you need to correct the index from 0 to 1-based, like this:

$('#status' + (index + 1))

Also refactoring your code to something simpler can often fix hidden errors, or at least make the error more obvious. I'd suggest something along these lines:

if (index == row)
{
    if (status == 0) {
        html = "<img alt='inproc' src='images/loading.gif' />";
    } else {
        html = "complete";
    }
    $('#status'+index).html(html);
}

You should also use C# idiom for looping, < x not <= x - 1:

for(i=0; i < Request.Files.Count; i++)
share|improve this answer
    
jQuery's "each" method starts indexing at 0. –  Rich Dec 20 '09 at 23:35
    
Yep, exactly. He's searching for '#status0' but I bet that the first element is called "#status1" in the HTML. –  Mark Byers Dec 20 '09 at 23:42
    
Thanks for all your help. That was a good guess but the table id labels start at 0 also (I added the table to my post) –  Code Sherpa Dec 21 '09 at 3:59
    
Thanks Mark. I cleaned up my code per your suggested and added a longer delay so I could see it happening in slow motion and it worked perfectly. Not sure what exactly the problem was but I credited you as it helped my thinking. Thanks again. –  Code Sherpa Dec 21 '09 at 4:06
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I'm not entirely sure what you're trying to do as it's not clear where the #status elements are. However, assuming they're cells within the row it might be better to give them a class "status" and then write something like

function PublishUpdate(percent, message, row, status) {
    $('#picTableDisplay tbody tr:eq('+row+') .status').html(
        status==0 ? '<img alt="inproc" src="images/loading.gif"/>' : 'complete'
    );
}
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