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I need some help with a php code which torment me 2-3 hours. Ny methods tried but no result. I want to take the first and second word after the @, eg @John Doe and php result took me John and Doe

I thing something that: (Edited)

$q = 'Hi @Stefan Simeonov kak si? @Krasi avramov';
    if (preg_match_all("(@[^ ]+[ ][^ ]+)", $q, $match)) {
        foreach ($match[0] as $singleMatch) {
           $finded[] = $singleMatch; 
           $success = 1;
        }
    } elseif (preg_match_all("(@[^ ]+)", $q, $match)) {
        foreach ($match[0] as $singleMatch) {
            $finded[] = $singleMatch; 
            $success = 1;
        }
    } else {
        $success = 0;
    }

    if($success = 1) {
        $replace = $q;
        foreach ($finded as $user) {
            $expl = explode("@",$user);
            $rep = '<a href="?profile='.$expl[1].'">'.$expl[1].'</a>';
            $replace = str_replace($user,$rep,$replace);
        }
        echo $replace;
    } else {
        echo $q;
    }
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1  
You need to add some code indicating where you possibly went wrong, and what is the result you expect. –  mavrosxristoforos Oct 15 '13 at 8:17
    
    
Can there be multiple @... in one string? –  Marty McVry Oct 15 '13 at 8:27
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7 Answers

Using a regular expression for example:

<?php
$q = 'Hi @John Doe kak si?';

if (preg_match('/@(\w+)\s(\w+)/', $q, $matches)) {
    var_dump($matches);
}

This will look for a word after a @, followed by a space, followed by another word.

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This output: Array ( [0] => @John Doe [1] => John [2] => Doe ) I'm not sure if OP wants to have @ in output. –  Adam Oct 15 '13 at 8:41
    
@Adam Then the OP just needs to use $matches[1] and $matches[2]. –  deceze Oct 15 '13 at 9:21
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You can do something like this:

<?
$q = 'Hi @John Doe kak si?';
$explodeTab = explode("@",$q);
$words = explode(" ",$explodeTab[1]);
print_r($words);
?>

WORKING CODE

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1  
This is the best method –  Nathan Srivi Oct 15 '13 at 8:29
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You can use a regex of (@[^ ]+[ ][^ ]+) for this:

<?php
    $q = 'Hi @Stefan Simeonov kak si?';
    if (preg_match_all("(@[^ ]+[ ][^ ]+)", $q, $match)) {
        foreach ($match[0] as $singleMatch) {
            echo 'Found match: ' . $singleMatch . PHP_EOL;
        }
    }
?>

Will output:

Found match: @Stefan Simeonov

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Thanks!!! It works :)) –  Стефан Симеонов Oct 15 '13 at 8:29
    
[ ] → just a space; no need to make a character group for a single character. –  deceze Oct 15 '13 at 9:22
    
@deceze I know - it's pure readability for me. That way I can skim the code and know that I did it on purpose. –  h2ooooooo Oct 15 '13 at 9:22
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Assuming that words are always separated by spaces, you can achieve this by first splitting the input string on the @ character and then taking the 1th item and splitting that on the space character and reducing that result to the words that you need.

<?php
$q = 'Hi @John Doe kak si?';
$atSplitResult = explode('@', $q);
$spaceSplitResult = explode(' ', $atSplitResult[1]);
$firstTwoWords = array_slice($spaceSplitResult, 0, 2);

var_dump($firstTwoWords);
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Let's say, we have a sentence

Let's see, @mike, how are you doing?

now:

$atExploded = explode('@', $str); //where $str is our string
if(count($atExploded)){
  foreach($atExploded as $at){
    $spaceExplode = explode(' ', $at);
    echo $spaceExplode[0].' '.$spaceExplode[1]; //after checking that [0] and [1] are reachable
  }
}

of course you should cut any unwanted characters (like braces, colons and so on) but I hope you get the idea.

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PHP

$string = 'Hi @John Doe kak si?';
$regex = preg_match("/@(.+?)\s(.+?)\s/", $string, $matches);
var_dump($matches);

Returns

array(3) { [0]=> string(10) "@John Doe " [1]=> string(4) "John" [2]=> string(3) "Doe" }
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You can write something like this. This will output @John Doe

<?php
$q = 'Hi @John Doe kak si?';
$q = preg_match('/@[A-Za-z]+\s[A-Za-z]+/', $q, $match);
print_r($match);

?>
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