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I am trying to implement a get_date function which I want to use to build higher-level functions (for example, get_payment_date given below). This is my code:

from datetime import datetime

def get_date(year=None, month=None, day=None):
    '''Returns now, with the given parts overwritten'''
    dt = datetime.now()
    if not year  is None : dt.year  = year
    if not month is None : dt.month = month
    if not day   is None : dt.day   = day
    return dt

def get_payment_date():
    return get_date(day=15)

print get_payment_date()

But if fails:

AttributeError: attribute 'day' of 'datetime.date' objects is not writable

I get it. How can I solve this? How can I "overwrite" only some parts of now?

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get_date(month=15) what does this mean? That it is 15 months from now? –  Games Brainiac Oct 15 '13 at 8:40
    
Oooops, bad example. Let me correct it. –  jeckyll2hide Oct 15 '13 at 8:41
    
What are you looking for? there is no way to over write datetime, however you could try to generate a new list of (year, month, day) and then generate the new datetime –  Carlos Oct 15 '13 at 8:42
    
I get that I can not modify a datetime object. How can I create the datetime object with the same values as now would return, but with some parts fixed by me? –  jeckyll2hide Oct 15 '13 at 8:44
    
@gonvaled Yes, that you can. –  Games Brainiac Oct 15 '13 at 8:44
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

datetime.datetime and datetime.date objects are immutable.

You can do dt = dt.replace(year = year) to get a new datetime object based on an old one.

You don't necessarily want to do that three times, but something like this might suit you:

def get_date(**kwargs):
    '''Returns now, with the given parts overwritten'''
    dt = datetime.now()
    # optionally, depending on intended use of this function
    kwargs = { k : v for k,v in kwargs.items() if v is not None }
    return dt.replace(**kwargs)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That is whay I was looking for. I missed it in the docs :( –  jeckyll2hide Oct 15 '13 at 8:46
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This is what I wanted (thanks to Steve Jessop):

from datetime import datetime

def get_date(year=None, month=None, day=None):
    '''Returns now, with the given parts overwritten'''
    dt = datetime.now()
    kwargs = {}
    if year  : kwargs['year']  = year
    if month : kwargs['month'] = month
    if day   : kwargs['day'] = day
    if kwargs : return dt.replace(**kwargs)
    else      : return dt

def get_payment_date():
    return get_date(day=15)

print get_payment_date()

Notice that I need to build a kwargs since dt.replace does not accept None as value for year / month / day. Also, I removed is not None check, since a 0 value means also no replacement.

share|improve this answer
    
FYI, datetime.datetime.replace() already returns the identical object if kwargs is empty, so you don't need to do that test if you don't want. –  Steve Jessop Oct 15 '13 at 9:01
    
@SteveJessop: ah! you mean that last check? But I guess the check is less overhead than calling replace, even if it is doing nothing? –  jeckyll2hide Oct 15 '13 at 21:01
    
it's probably a tiny bit less effort if it does nothing, and is a tiny bit more effort if it calls replace (because replace does the same check again). I was thinking about the amount of code, though, rather than performance. –  Steve Jessop Oct 16 '13 at 0:44
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