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I'm monkey-patching Array to add my own method Array#left_outer_join. Since I'm new to Ruby, I want to do pretty things and have a method that'll return a new array and a bang method that will replace my current one. However, I ended up writing the same code twice with the only difference between non-bang and bang method being a call to map or map! respectively.

I've read a bit on blocks and metaprogramming and ended up with the following:

class Array
  def left_outer_join_proc(method, ary, &block)
    self.send(method) do |obj1|
      ary.each do |obj2|
        if yield obj1, obj2
          obj2.keys.each do |key|
            obj1[key] = obj2[key]
          end
          break
        end
      end
      obj1
    end
  end

  def left_outer_join(ary, &block)
    left_outer_join_proc(:map, ary, &block)
  end

  def left_outer_join!(ary, &block)
    left_outer_join_proc(:map!, ary, &block)
  end
end

events.left_outer_join!(users) {|event, user| event['user_id'] == user['user_id'] }

So far this works just fine, Object.send is (according to SO) the best use to dynamically call a method and I kinda like this approach (though the purist in me loathes polluting the Array class with a third method).

The question now: what are the best practices to define both a non-bang and a bang method and keep it DRY?

EDIT: This question is not about "does bang method mean destructive method?" but really about "If I were to write Array#add_two and Array#add_two!, how could ensure I don't have to define a method with map{|x| x +2 } and another with map!{|x| x + 2 }.

I know I could use

def add_two!(x)
  self = add_two(x)
end 

but I'm asking for a "best performance, best readability" type of answer (Look at the sources for Array#map and Array#map! to see the 'subtle' performance difference) .

share|improve this question
    
"best readability" is subjective, of course. I'd choose self = add_two(x) over most (all?) alternatives. – Sergio Tulentsev Oct 15 '13 at 9:33
    
JFYI, you don't need to use double backticks for inline code. Single backticks are enough. – Sergio Tulentsev Oct 15 '13 at 9:35
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can also factor out the code for a single item, then be a little more verbose in the array methods. The left_outer_join_element() method here makes practical sense on its own and is reusable even for non-Array objects.

def left_outer_join(ary, &block)
  self.map { |e| left_outer_join_element(e, ary, &block) }
end

def left_outer_join!(ary, &block)
  self.map! { |e| left_outer_join_element(e, ary, &block) }
end

protected

def left_outer_join_element(element, ary, &block)
  ary.each do |obj|
    if yield element, obj
      obj.keys.each do |key|
        element[key] = obj[key]
      end
      break
    end
  end
  element
end
share|improve this answer
    
Best answer hands down. Nothing came out of the "What are the best practices?" so I guess there are none but you managed to refactor my logic function into something that can be used somewhere else by itself and not just be an 'illogic' refactor written just for the sake of avoiding DRY. Kudos :) – red Oct 15 '13 at 12:24

what are the best practices to define both a non-bang and a bang method

There are no such "best practices" that apply to all situations. Use your common sense.

For example, map! of array will mutate the array in-place. The bang version means "Danger! Destructive method!". Possible implementation:

def map
  # do the mapping
end

def map!
  @elements = map
end

save! of ActiveRecord will raise error if operation was unsuccessful. Bang means "Will raise error".

In general, exclamation mark in the method names should warn the programmer, "look out, something dangerous can/will happen here". Possible implementation:

def save
  save!
  true
rescue
  false
end

def save!
  # do the saving. Raise error if something goes wrong
end

Again, there can be zillion of use-cases for bang versions of a method, so there can not be a single pattern/approach.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, the part about "non-bang vs bang" was unclear. My question was in term of code base: If I were to write Array#add_two and Array_add_two!, how could ensure I don't have to define a method with "map{|x| x +2 }" and another with "map!{|x| x + 2 }" which would effectively repeating myself. – red Oct 15 '13 at 9:24
    
In this concrete case a proc would serve. add2 = proc{|x| x + 2}; map(&add2); map!(&add2) – Sergio Tulentsev Oct 15 '13 at 9:26

Looking at the "repetition" here:

  def left_outer_join(ary, &block)
    left_outer_join_proc(:map, ary, &block)
  end

  def left_outer_join!(ary, &block)
    left_outer_join_proc(:map!, ary, &block)
  end

I would say you have done as much as is reasonable in this case. The def and method names are necessary, and so is the call to the proc where you do have most of the shared logic. Although the difference in terms of string edits is low, the placement of the differences is critical. It's also fairly easy to read and understand your code.

To go further you could do something like

 ['', '!'].each do |bang_type|
   define_method( "left_outer_join#{bang_type}" ) do |ary, &block|
     left_outer_join_proc( "map#{bang_type}", ary, &block )
   end
 end

But the above is taking the DRY concept to extremes where the resulting code is much harder to read and debug.

share|improve this answer

Some objects (e.g. Arrays or Strings) have a method that allows you to replace the entire internal state of the object with the state of another object of the same type. This method is typically aptly named replace. For objects which have such a method, you can simply implement the destructive method in terms of replace and the non-destructive method:

def foo
  # return new instance
end

def foo!
  replace(foo)
  nil # or self
end

Conversely, all objects have a method which creates a duplicate copy with identical internal state, called dup. You can implement the non-destructive version in terms of dup and the destructive version:

def foo!
  # modify internal state
  nil # or self
end

def foo
  dup.foo!
end

There may be cases, however, where the destructive and non-destructive versions can be made more efficient by implementing them differently. In that case, some duplication probably can't be avoided.

Note that

self = add_two(x)

doesn't work. It isn't even syntactically valid. And even if it were syntactically valid, it would simply assign to a local variable named self and not change the special keyword self.

share|improve this answer
    
Since internally replace is actually a copy, it is the same principle as an assignement copy like in Sergio's implementation (def map!; @elements = map; end. Since we are mapping, I am looking for solution that would work straight on my source object. And sorry about the awful self = add_two(x), I must have gotten confused somewhere in syntaxes. – red Oct 15 '13 at 12:15

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