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I would like to know a way to get the range of values for a given thread in a parallized for loop in OpenMP with C++. For example in the following code I would like to know what the first value each thread uses in the loop for each thread.

#pragma omp parallel for schedule(static)
for(int i=0; i<n; i++) 

Let me give you an example of why I might want these values. Let's assume I want to fill an array with the sum of the counting numbers. The closed form solution for the sum of the counting number is n*(n+1)/2. To do this with OpenMP I could do this:

#pragma omp parallel for schedule(static)
for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {    
    a[i] = i*(i+1)/2;
}

However, I suspect a faster method to get the sum of the counting numbers is to not use the closed form solution each iteration (which has a square) and instead remember the sum each iteration like this:

int cnt = 0;
for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {
    cnt += i;
    a[i] = cnt;
}

But the only way to do this with OpenMP I can think of is explictly define the range values like this:

#pragma omp parallel
{
    const int ithread = omp_get_thread_num();
    const int nthreads = omp_get_num_threads();
    const int start = ithread*n/nthreads;
    const int finish = (ithread+1)*n/nthreads;

    int cnt = 0;
    int offset = (start-1)*(start)/2;
    for(int i=start; i<finish; i++) {
        cnt += i;
        a[i] = cnt + offset;
    }
}

If I could get the start value from #pragma omp parallel for schedule(static) then I would not have to define start, finish, ithread, and nthreads.

Edit: After reading Agner Fog's Optimizing C++ manual I realized that what I am doing is called induction. He gives an example of using induction to more efficiently calculate the values of a polynominal. Here are some examples from his manual

Without induction:

// Example 8.23a. Loop to make table of polynomial
const double A = 1.1, B = 2.2, C = 3.3; // Polynomial coefficients
double Table[100]; // Table
int x; // Loop counter
for (x = 0; x < 100; x++) {
    Table[x] = A*x*x + B*x + C; // Calculate polynomial

With induction:

// Example 8.23b. Calculate polynomial with induction variables
const double A = 1.1, B = 2.2, C = 3.3; // Polynomial coefficients
double Table[100]; // Table
int x; // Loop counter
const double A2 = A + A; // = 2*A
double Y = C; // = A*x*x + B*x + C
double Z = A + B; // = Delta Y
for (x = 0; x < 100; x++) {
    Table[x] = Y; // Store result
    Y += Z; // Update induction variable Y
    Z += A2; // Update induction variable Z
}

To do this with OpenMP I need to get the start value for each chunk. The only way to do this with OpenMP is to define the chunks manually.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is an extended comment rather than an answer ...

There is no OpenMP routine or pre-defined variable for getting the range of values for i (in your case) that each thread will execute. You'll have to write something along the lines that you have outlined to get those numbers yourself.

But before you do, stop and think a bit. All that extra code, and the effort to write and to maintain it, just to avoid one multiplication per iteration ! Even when you get your code working I doubt that any speedup you see will be worth the effort. Worse, as soon as you want to use a different schedule than static you will have to re-do the index calculations; for many of the other scheduling options the iterations executed by one thread won't be a simple range anyway.

You are programming against the grain, not only of OpenMP, but probably of parallel programming in general. Programs which can be handed out to threads without consideration of the number available at run time or how the run-time system will divide up the work and which do not have dependencies between tasks are ideal for parallelisation. They generally provide good scalability to large numbers of threads without a great deal of programmer effort.

The closed form solution you already have is all you need. Go with the flow. Programming against the grain will (inevitably I would argue) produce more complicated code which is difficult to maintain and which will rarely produce parallel speedups to compensate for their costs.

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Thank you for your answer. The sum of the counting numbers was just an example for the sake of argument. But I suspect that you're right in general in that it's hard to construct a case where remembering values between iterations beats a closed form solution. –  Z boson Oct 15 '13 at 10:56
    
I wonder why OpenMP does not provide a way to get the range values, at least for schedule(static). –  Z boson Oct 17 '13 at 6:06
    
I updated my question. I realized that what I am doing is called induction. I posted an example from Agner Fog's manual which shows how to do induction to calculate the values of a polynominal. I'm not convinced that induction with OpenMP is pointless. –  Z boson Dec 6 '13 at 10:40
    
Actually, I think you materially changed your question. Ask a new one, see what answers you get. –  High Performance Mark Dec 6 '13 at 10:58
    
Yes, I see your point. My original question asked about range values and gave induction as an example of why I might need them. Now it appears the question is about induction and how to do it with OpenMP. –  Z boson Dec 6 '13 at 11:37

Probably no way to do that. Even if you can get the ranges for each thread, such as start, where do you expect to inject it to for a single for loop like this?

#pragma omp parallel for schedule(static)
for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {    
    a[i] = ...
}

omp parallel for generally assume there's no dependencies between the iterations. If you add dependencies such as cnt, you may shouldn't use this directive.

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Look at the last code segment in my question and you will see how to do it. –  Z boson Oct 16 '13 at 6:56
    
I thought that approach is what you don't want. However it seems the only way is to replace omp parallel for by omp parallel as you showed. –  Eric Oct 16 '13 at 7:09
    
I mean if I knew start I could put #pragma omp for schedule(static) inside the last code segment and not define start, finish, ithread, and nethread. But anyway I can't know the range values so I have to do it the way I did. –  Z boson Oct 16 '13 at 7:20

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