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I'm wondering if

function pathJoin(uri,file){
    return url.format(
        url.parse(
            path.normalize(
                path.join(uri, file) 
            ).split(
                path.delimiter
            ).join("/")
        )
    );
}

and

function pathJoin(uri,file){
    var joined_path = path.join(uri, file);
    var normalized = path.normalize( joined_path );
    var splitted = normalized.split(path.delimiter);
    var joined = splitted.join("/");
    var parsed = url.parse(joined);
    return url.format(parsed);
}

will perform equally fast. Isn't there any penalization for switching from function to function multiple times?

share|improve this question
    
@tucuxi Does jsperf support NodeJS? (because that uses path and url from NodeJS) –  alexandernst Oct 15 '13 at 10:13
3  
Just benchmark it. Benchmark.js Then there's no need to wonder and you can use your real data as well. jsperf.com uses Benchmark in the backgroun AFAIK and it doesn't support Node.js directly. @alexandernst –  Nenotlep Oct 15 '13 at 10:14
    
Hmm, you are right. Otoh, the source for those functions seems to be standard JS: github.com/joyent/node/blob/master/lib/path.js. Results for jsperf under chrome (also uses V8) should be similar to those experienced under node.js –  tucuxi Oct 15 '13 at 10:19
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2 Answers

Note: path.join already returns a normalized path. They have the same performance... And don't use jsperf to benchmark node things.

CODE

var path = require ("path");
var url = require ("url");
var speedy = require ("speedy");

function pathJoin(uri,file){
    return url.format(
        url.parse(
            path.normalize(
                path.join(uri, file) 
            ).split(
                path.delimiter
            ).join("/")
        )
    );
}

function pathJoin2(uri,file){
    var joined_path = path.join(uri, file);
    var normalized = path.normalize( joined_path );
    var splitted = normalized.split(path.delimiter);
    var joined = splitted.join("/");
    var parsed = url.parse(joined);
    return url.format(parsed);
}

speedy.timeout (20000);
speedy.run ({
    "1": function (){
        pathJoin ("http://www.google.com", "file");
    },
    "2": function (){
        pathJoin2 ("http://www.google.com", "file");
    }
})

RESULT

File: t.js

Node v0.10.20
V8 v3.14.5.9
Speedy v0.0.8

Benchmarks: 2
Timeout: 20000ms (20s 0ms)
Samples: 3
Total time per benchmark: ~60000ms (1m 0s 0ms)
Total time: ~120000ms (2m 0s 0ms)

Higher is better (ops/sec)

1
  50,931 ± 0.1%
2
  51,029 ± 0.1%

Elapsed time: 120063ms (2m 0s 63ms)
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My concern is that isn't there any overheap at all? Also, can you re-run this, but make it run a little bit longer. Perhaps 20s per function? –  alexandernst Oct 15 '13 at 10:38
    
Node runs on V8 -- according to this, V8 already does many behind-the-scenes optimizations: stackoverflow.com/questions/4710396/… –  tucuxi Oct 15 '13 at 10:52
    
No overhead, no nothing. Updating answer... with 1min per function –  Gabriel Llamas Oct 15 '13 at 10:52
    
@tucuxi the accepted answer there isn't really good... in fact reality is completely opposite. In general, the more "idiomatic js" your code is, the slower it runs. The more it is written as if js was static language, the faster it is. –  Esailija Oct 16 '13 at 12:57
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Generally syntactic differences never affect performance. The compiler doesn't operate at the source code level.

In practice there are exceptions of course. In the following for example V8 is not smart enough to optimize the latter:

function a(arg) {
    return typeof arg === "string";
}

function b(arg) {
    var tmp = typeof arg;
    return tmp === "string";
}

The latter will actually lookup the type string for the variable, and then compare the string to "string" - rather than checking if arg is a string which is what the code semantically does. Check how radically different the generated code for the functions are: http://pastebin.com/h7PsV39p

This is also funny because people optimize by "caching typeof", in the process they are making it much slower because V8 only recognizes full uncached typeof expressions.

share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, but my concern is that this isn't just a syntactic difference, but rather an overheap, as the first way I'm nesting function calls. –  alexandernst Oct 16 '13 at 10:31
    
@alexandernst I didn't read the first code because it's unreadable but I assume the only difference is temporary variables, in which case my answer stands. –  Esailija Oct 16 '13 at 10:34
    
Generally speaking there is no theoretical reason for generating worse code in the second case. It's just that typeof v === str recognition greatly predates Crankshaft which made it possible. And when Crankshaft was developed nobody bothered to move pattern recognition to the place where it belongs. –  Vyacheslav Egorov Oct 16 '13 at 13:43
    
@VyacheslavEgorov yeah I have clarified that in practice you can find exceptions like this :-) –  Esailija Oct 16 '13 at 14:45
1  
@GabrielLlamas to print the code, build v8 either in debug mode or with disassembler enabled. Then run some code that calls functions in an infinite loop with flags --print_opt_code --code_comments (or you can alternatively use the flag --allow-natives-syntax and call %OptimizeFunctionOnNextCall instead of looping) –  Esailija Oct 17 '13 at 4:01
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