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This is my program:

int  a;
int main(void)
{

a=10;
//declare and create 2 pipes
int p1[2], p2[2];
pipe(p1);
pipe(p2);
int ra;
for(int i=0;i<3;i++)
{   
   pid=fork();
   if(pid==0) 
   {
      close(p1[1]);
      close(p2[0]);
      read(p1[0],&ra,3);

      while(ra>0)
      {

        ra-=1;
        printf("%i a are available, reported by process %i\n",ra,getpid());
        close(p1[0]);
        write(p2[1],&ra,3);

        close(p2[1]);

      }
      break;

   }
   else
   if(pid>0)
   {


   }else
   {
       wait(NULL);

   }

 }
 }

if(pid>0)    //parent process outside for loop
{
    close(p1[0]);
    close(p2[1]);
    if(a>0)
    {
        write(p1[1],&a,3);
        close(p1[1]);
    }
    else
        exit(0);
    read(p2[0],&ra,3);
    a=ra;
    close(p2[0]);

 }

What it does is creating 6 child processes from parent process, then assigning them to access the global variable a and decreasing it 1. These processes communicate with their parent process via two pipes. Parent process will write the value to the pipe 1. Child processes will read it from pipe 1, print it out and write it back to the pipe 2 after decreasing it 1. Finally, parent process will read the value from pipe 2 and check if the value > 0 to decide to stop the program or not.

I expect the following result:

35 seats are available, reported by process 1
34 seats are available, reported by process 2
33 seats are available, reported by process 5
32 seats are available, reported by process 0
31 seats are available, reported by process 2
....
1 seats are available, reported by process 3
0 seats are available, reported by process 1

but the actual output is:

35 seats are available, reported by process 2
34 seats are available, reported by process 2
33 seats are available, reported by process 2
32 seats are available, reported by process 2
31 seats are available, reported by process 2
....
1 seats are available, reported by process 2
0 seats are available, reported by process 2

Question: I dont know how to force other child processes running alternatively (or randomly) so the result would be like the first one above. Please help me.

share|improve this question
1  
Something is very wrong in your while loop. You both write to, and close, p2[1] each time in the loop. –  David Schwartz Oct 15 '13 at 10:24
    
@DavidSchwartz If I am wrong, can you be specific? What do you mean by "You both write to"? –  Tung Pham Oct 15 '13 at 10:39
    
Each time in the while loop, you write to p2[1] and close p2[1]. That can't possibly be right because that means you close the same thing more than once and you write to it after you close it. Looks closely at your while loop. –  David Schwartz Oct 15 '13 at 10:48

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you care the order in which the work gets done, you'll have to write code to enforce a particular ordering. Otherwise, the implementation is free to choose whatever order is most efficient. You can use a mutex, a sempahore, a pipe, a file, or any other synchronization mechanism you like -- but you have to actually do it. It won't happen by itself.

Why do you call wait if fork returns an error?

share|improve this answer
    
Schewartz I dont need it to be ordering. What I want is other child processes have chance to access and change the value. –  Tung Pham Oct 15 '13 at 10:42
    
@TungPham They have a chance to access and change the value. So you have what you want. (They're not taking advantage of that chance because that is inefficient. If you want something inefficient, you have to force it.) –  David Schwartz Oct 15 '13 at 10:54
    
I mean, how to make the very first process relinquish the CPU, so others can get in and change the value as well. It is like pthread_yield in pthread, but I do not want to use pthread. In short, I want the output like the first output above. –  Tung Pham Oct 15 '13 at 10:56
    
@TungPham You can use sched_yield if your platform supports it. (If not, your platform likely has some equivalent.) That will encourage the system to be less efficient and switch processes even where that's wasteful and causes poor performance. –  David Schwartz Oct 15 '13 at 10:58
    
I thought shced_yeild is just for threads, not for processes. –  Tung Pham Oct 15 '13 at 11:03

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