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We have been discussing this topic today at work, and none of us could come up with a definitive answer about that question. Consider the following situation:

int foo()
{
  int err;

  err = some_call(1);

  if (err != 0)
    return err;

  err = some_call(2);

  if (err != 0)
    return err;

  err = some_call(3);

  if (err != 0)
    return err;

  err = some_call(4);

  if (err != 0)
    return err;

  bar();

  return err;
}

There is a lot of code repetition. Obviously, this could be factorized with a macro, sadly not with a template (because of the return clause). Or at least not directly.

Now the question is, if we were to replace those return error codes with exceptions, and catching those exceptions right away, are compilers allowed and smart enough to detect the pattern and avoid throwing exceptions altogether ?

Here is an illustration of what I mean:

int foo()
{
  try
  {
    // some_call now throws a ErrorReturned exception that contains the error code upon failure.
    some_call(1);
    some_call(2);
    some_call(3);
    some_call(4);
  }
  catch (ErrorReturned& ex)
  {
    return ex.error_code();
  }

  bar();

  return 0;
}

Now, there is no current performance issue and so yes, we don't need to optimize or even care about that. This is more to understand what compilers are allowed to do.

In short so, is it a "good" practice and if so, can compilers optimize that by not throwing exceptions at all ? (Assuming the exception construction has no side effect)

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1  
"This is more to understand what compilers are allowed to do." Do you know the as-if rule, [intro.execution]/1 (and /8)? –  dyp Oct 15 '13 at 12:25
1  
How about simply if ((err = some_call(1))) return err; repeated for 2, 3 and 4? –  NPE Oct 15 '13 at 12:27
1  
If some_call gets inlined then sure, the compiler is allowed to replace the throw/catch with in effect a goto. As to whether your compiler does or not, there's no substitute for staring at (dis-)assembly :-) At a quick look, gcc 4.8.1 with -O3, a function with a throw/catch in it the emitted code still allocates an exception object and unwinds. –  Steve Jessop Oct 15 '13 at 12:28
    
Note that most sane compilers have zero performance impact on using exceptions as long as they are not thrown, and are usually quite fast in case they are thrown too. –  PlasmaHH Oct 15 '13 at 12:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

"Are compilers smart enough" seems to hint that Exceptions don't serve a purpose in your project and, if that's the case, you shouldn't use them in the first place (unless of course you actually have the possibility of getting an exception).

Short-answer: No, compilers will not remove your exceptions / exception handling based on the pattern you're using them.

When you use a try/catch, the exception it handles is added to the main exception table; this table can be monitored, hooked into, added on and removed from. Just because you catch the exception right away doesn't mean other things aren't happening with it as well.

Side Source:
A paper was written on Optimizing Away C++ Exception Handling that outlines all (almost all) current implementations of optimizations pertaining to exceptions. Throughout it, it shows that at the current time they are not stripped at compile-time but optimizations are made to them. The paper itself recommends enhancements to EH (Exception Handling) to remove the unnecessary exceptions and, overall, is a pretty good read.

UPDATE (additional sources)
Looking further into the topic, the GCC compiler appears to not optimize away exceptions; however, it does offer an option to do so: -fno-exceptions. This option will remove all exceptions and directly replace them with abort() calls.

Another source (here on StackOverflow) doesn't directly mention "removing exceptions" but does outline the two optimizations made to exceptions, setjmp/longjmp and Zero-Cost. It can be inferred by the highlighting of the actual enhancements without mention of "completely removing the exception" that there is no such optimization (yet, at least with the mentioned compilers). Another source with more detailed info on these optimizations can be found here.

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@Mgetz The "standards" don't define how compilers do optimizations and each does their own their own way; we could scour the manuals of each, possibly even the source of each or even the assembly they generate to determine if they strip exceptions that are immediately used - but I think that's a little overkill unless you're interested in a lot of research. I've linked to a paper that outlines current compiler optimizations for Exception Handling that has done a lot of research already, hopefully it can better answer your question =] –  newfurniturey Oct 15 '13 at 12:38
1  
I can't find a date in that paper, but it cites a draft of the C++98 Standard -- it seems it's rather old. –  dyp Oct 15 '13 at 12:42
    
@newfurniturey hence why I removed my comment, I was more curious to see if the standard explicitly forbid certain optimizations –  Mgetz Oct 15 '13 at 12:43
    
Ignoring whether it is new or old, that paper seems to focus on how to make exceptions faster when they happen. The question at hand is whether the compiler can avoid the exception from happening, which is a different question. Although to be honest I would be utterly surprised if any compiler removed the exception in the code above –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 15 '13 at 12:52

The repetition in your code can trivially be removed with a simple loop:

int foo()
{
    for (int x : {1, 2, 3, 4})
    {
        int err = some_call(x);
        if (err != 0) return err;
    }
    bar();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess I should have made that clear in the question, but the some_call(int) are merely an example. In reality, those are completely different functions with similar prototypes. Sorry for the confusing example. –  ereOn Dec 19 '13 at 9:32
    
@ereOn Okay, how about something like this? –  FredOverflow Dec 19 '13 at 10:03

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