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I have a bash script which is set via cron to run every 5min... there's times when the next 5min comes and the last one is still running. Whats the best way to stop the script when cron attempts to run it if its still going?

Looks like adding something like this http://stackoverflow.com/a/12706574/800592 to the beginning of my bash script would do the trick?

I don't get what the code is trying to do though and what the proper syntax for my script would be?

...
The  third form is convenient inside shell scripts, and is usually used
       the following manner:

       (
         flock -n 9 || exit 1
         # ... commands executed under lock ...
       ) 9>/var/lock/mylockfile
...

perhaps something like this would also work?

flock -n -e 200 || exit 1
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2 Answers

flock manages file lock from scripts. Command line parameter -n means that flock will fail if file can not be locked, so command after || will be called in that case. Number 9 in your example is file descriptor used to access file defined at the end of command. You should use number high enough not to interfere with other files you use in your shell script. You assign file to file descriptor using >, >> or <. If you use > or >> file will be created for you, but you need write permission. If you use < file must exist, but you only need read permission. Your write your script code right after flock -n 9 || exit 1 line.

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Why don't you try something like this:

#!/bin/bash
# Check whether lock file exists
if [ -e /tmp/mylockfile ]; then
  echo "Still running, exiting"
  exit
fi

# Create a lock 
touch /tmp/mylockfile

# Do stuff...

# Clean up
rm /tmp/mylockfile

This is a little more sophisticated:

#!/bin/bash

# Check whether lock file exists
iter=0
while [ -e /tmp/mylockfile ]; do
  if [ $((iter++)) -ge 60 ]; then
    echo "Timeout, exiting"
    exit
  fi
  sleep 1
done

# Create a lock 
touch /tmp/mylockfile

# Do stuff...

# Clean up
rm /tmp/mylockfile

The loops waits 60 seconds for the lockfile to be removed...

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I think you may need to consider a more serious re-design. Consider what happens if, for some reason, the script starts requiring 6 minutes to complete. Then the second iteration starts 1 minute late, meaning the third iteration starts 2 minutes late, etc., until pretty soon you have several hundred copies waiting to run, and contending for the lock (however you implement it) whenever the one iteration that is currently running releases it... –  twalberg Oct 15 '13 at 14:33
    
Jup, I know... You would need a lot more logic to handle those cases. But this is just an example, not a full scheduling solution. I personally would use the first example, I might miss some cycles, but it's quite robust... –  Alexander Vogt Oct 15 '13 at 14:52
    
I agree, the first example suits me well –  Tony Oct 15 '13 at 15:52
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