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Is the compiler allowed to reorder function calls when whole program optimization is enabled? (/GL switch)

Wouldn't that break code in multithreaded environments?

Consider the following pseudo-code:

Thread1
{
  numbers.append( 1 );
  numbers.append( 2 );
  numbers.append( 3 );

  numbers.append( 1 );
  numbers.append( 2 );
  numbers.append( 3 );

  manager.signalFinished();
}

Thread2
{
  // is the compiler allowed to reorder the next two lines?

  bool isReady = manager.isFinished();
  int lastElem = numbers.getLastElement();

  if( 3 == lastElem )
  {
    if( isReady )
    {
      TerminateThread();
    }
    else
    {
      // go back to start
      continue;
    }
  }
}

We have a total number of 2 threads.

Thread 1 will put numbers in a list and once finished, trigger a signal that all numbers are in the list. Assume that for a complete list, the last element always has to be 3.

Thread 2 will check whether the signal is set and whether the last element is 3.

Assuming that all functions are in different compilation units, the program should run just fine.

If whole program optimization would enable the compiler to reorder function calls ( or to execute them in parallel ), this program would be likely to be broken. The first two lines of Thread 2 seem unrelated to the compiler ( they do not share a mutex ), whereas they are actually linked logically on a deep level.

The reordering could lead to the situation:

Thread1: numbers.append( 1 );
         numbers.append( 2 );
         numbers.append( 3 );

Thread2: int lastElem = numbers.getLastElement(); // is 3

Thread1: numbers.append( 1 );
         numbers.append( 2 );
         numbers.append( 3 );
         manager.signalFinished();

Thread2: bool isReady = manager.isFinished(); // is true
         // now TerminateThread would be invoked
         // and the second 1, 2, 3 of Thread1 would be lost
share|improve this question
3  
Does isFinished() call use any locks or atomics? If yes, then the compiler is not allowed to move reads up before an acquire-and-load. If not, then your program has a data race and exhibits undefined behavior - in which case, the compiler can legally do anything at all. –  Igor Tandetnik Oct 15 '13 at 14:10
    
It's also suspicious that Thread 2 has to do the signalling on behalf of Thread 1. How does Thread 2 know that? Obviously Thread 1 must have signaled Thread 2, so Thread 2 can signal Thread 3. But why not do so directly? –  MSalters Oct 15 '13 at 15:21

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