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I am trying to write a function in bash that takes a space delimited string and outputs the 1st word in that string. I tried

function myFunc { a=$1; b=($a); echo ${b[0]};}

but with

myStr="hello world"
myFunc myStr

I get no output.

if I replace a=$1 in the function definition above with a="hello world", then I get the expected result on applying

myFunc

result: hello

Also if instead of passing myStr as an argument I pass in "hello world" directly, it also works:

myFunc "hello world"

result: hello

I tried all kinds of indirections with the exclamation points, as well as the expr constructions but to no avail. Finally the following seems to work:

function el_index { alias a=$1; b=($a); echo ${b[2]};}

I would like to gather here all other possible ways to accomplish the same thing as above. In particular, is there a way to bypass the intermediate variable a completely, and do something like b=(${$a}) in the second statement within the function body above? By the way, the construction

b=($a)

splits the string stored in a into words using the default delimiter, which is a single white space.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't "get no output" -- you do get the first word of the string you passed:

function myFunc { a=$1; b=($a); echo ${b[0]}; }
myStr="hello world"
myFunc myStr
myStr

If you're passing a variable name, you have to indirectly expand the variable in your function

function myFunc { a=${!1}; b=($a); echo ${b[0]}; }
# ..................^^^^^
myFunc myStr
hello

Here's another technique: it takes the variable name as the first parameter, then overwrites the positional parameters with the words in the value of the variable. The first word is then the first positional parameter

firstword() { set -- ${!1}; echo $1; }
firstword myStr
hello
share|improve this answer
    
Oh nice! I thought I had to do !$1 for indirection of function argument. That's very useful to know. – John Jiang Oct 15 '13 at 17:11
    
Second one is quite hacky, but definitely worth noting for future situations:) – John Jiang Oct 15 '13 at 17:14
1  
I would argue "hacky" -- for shells without arrays (i.e. /bin/sh) it's a useful technique. – glenn jackman Oct 15 '13 at 17:15
1  
Indirection is not present in the POSIX specification, so I don't think you can rely on indirection to work in /bin/sh. zsh, for instance, uses a different syntax. – chepner Oct 15 '13 at 17:23

You can get 1st word this way:

myStr="hello world"
echo "${myStr%% *}"
hello

And your function will be:

function myFunc { echo "${1%% *}"; }
share|improve this answer
    
You could also say echo "${1%% *}"; (eliminating the use of variable). – devnull Oct 15 '13 at 17:13
    
@devnull: You mean echo "${1%% *}"; I updated – anubhava Oct 15 '13 at 17:14

This seems rather simple if I understand you correctly. I also think your method works.

    function myFunc1 { 
    a="${1}"; b=( $a ); echo ${b[0]};
    }

    function myFunc2 { 
    echo "${1}" | awk '{ print $1 }'
    }

    function myFunc3 { 
    echo "${1%% *}"
    }

    myFunc1 "Hello World"
    # Which prints out: Hello

    myFunc2 "Hello World"
    # Which prints out: Hello

    myFunc3 "Hello World"
    # Which prints out: Hello

Output:

    ./test.sh
    Hello
    Hello
    Hello
share|improve this answer

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