Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using the remote method of jQuery Validation to check if a username already exists in the system. The script does_user_exist.php returns 1 if the user exists.

$registration.find(".username").each(function() {
    var $this = $(this);
    $this.rules('add', {
        remote: {
            url: "does_user_exist.php",
            type: "post",
            dataType: "json",
            data: {uname: function(){ return $this.val(); } },
            async: false,
            success: function (data) { //returns 1 if user exists
                if (data) {
                   console.log("false!");
                   return "Sorry, that user already exists." //doesn't work
                   //return false;        //doesn't work
                   //return data;         //doesn't work
                   //return {"string"};   //doesn't work
                   //return {0: "string"};//doesn't work
                } else {
                   console.log("true!");
                   return true;
                }
            }
        },
        messages: {
            remote: jQuery.format("{0}") //doesn't work
            // remote: "Simple string doesn't work here either"
        }
    });
});

My problem is that the error message is never displayed. I can see from my console.log output that it correctly logs false! when the user exists, but the error message never shows up.

As you can see from the commented out lines, I've been trying to figure out what exactly I'm doing wrong via guess-and-check, on the assumption that I'm somehow returning the error string in the wrong format, but I'm not having success.

Edit3: I was able to get the backend response to be changed. The PHP is now sending JSON encoded true/false, to no avail. We have tried sending the backend response in the following ways, but the plugin doesn't seem to be catching it no matter what we do:

json_encode( false )
json_encode( '["false"]' )
json_encode( "false" )
json_encode( ["false"] )
"false"
false
NULL
""
0

As far as I can tell based on the documentation, one of these should have worked:

The response is evaluated as JSON and must be true for valid elements, and can be any false, undefined or null for invalid elements, using the default message;

Note, the answer to this question may be related to this issue.

Here is the revised code:

$registration.find(".username").each(function() {
    var $this = $(this);
    remote: {
        url:  "does_user_exist.php",
        type: "post",
        data: {entityExistence: function(){return $this.val();} },
        success: function(data){ console.log(data); }
    },
    messages: {
        remote: "Sorry, that username is not available."
   }
});

The PHP script is always returning true or false correctly. According to the documentation, anything except for true should trigger the error message. But the error message doesn't come up. I know error messaging is working because there are other checks are working fine (e.g. rangelength, removed from pasted-in code here for clarity).

share|improve this question
    
You did not read the documentation for the remote method? It clearly explains what must be returned by your server code. –  Sparky Oct 16 '13 at 2:52
    
@Sparky: By the way, yes I did read the documentation, specifically this part of it: The response is evaluated as JSON and must be true for valid elements, and can be any false, undefined or null for invalid elements, using the default message; or a string, eg. "That name is already taken, try peter123 instead" to display as the error message. –  brentonstrine Oct 17 '13 at 18:33
    
Also quoting: "must be true for valid elements" ~ does it return true when the user does not exist? Is your 1 being interpreted as a string or as true? We already know 1 is not "false, undefined or null" –  Sparky Oct 17 '13 at 19:02
1  
Yes, this is what the documentation is saying. By "response", it means the response from your server script: "The response is evaluated as JSON and must be true for valid elements, and can be any false, undefined or null for invalid elements..." –  Sparky Oct 17 '13 at 19:10
1  
You don't need to return anything in particular via your JavaScript. The docs are only talking about what comes back from your server. –  Sparky Oct 17 '13 at 19:12
show 3 more comments

3 Answers

The documentation for the remote method states:

The response is evaluated as JSON and must be true for valid elements, and can be any false, undefined or null for invalid elements, using the default message; or a string, eg. "That name is already taken, try peter123 instead" to display as the error message.

When it refers to "response", it only means the response returned from your server-side logic.


Quote OP:

"The script does_user_exist.php returns 1 if the user exists."

This might be the opposite of what you want. Since 1 may be getting interpreted as true, which tells the plugin it "passed" validation. As per docs, if the user exists and you want to trigger an error message, the response must be false, undefined, null, or a string (the message).

share|improve this answer
    
Please see my edit, I was able to change the PHP response, but the same issue is happening. –  brentonstrine Oct 21 '13 at 19:28
    
@brentonstrine, have you tried echo "true"? See: stackoverflow.com/a/18862144/594235 –  Sparky Oct 21 '13 at 19:34
    
Also see: stackoverflow.com/a/16214487/594235 –  Sparky Oct 21 '13 at 19:42
add comment
up vote -1 down vote accepted

Ok, finally figured it out, randomly. The success callback was apparently ruining everything. All I had to do was remove this:

success: function(data){
    console.log(data);
}

As soon as I did that, everything worked perfectly as expected using simple string responses:

"true"

and

"false"

I can not explain this, but I hope that someone updates the documentation! I noticed that using complete does not break it the way that success does.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Returning the string does not automatically display it. If you want to display it you need to do something like this:

$('#myDiv').html('<p class="error">Sorry, that user already exists.</p>');
share|improve this answer
2  
Thanks for this tip, but I need the validator to handle the error instead of handling it manually. I am integrating it with tooltipster, but beyond that, it doesn't make sense to use a plugin that handles error messages automatically and then circumvent that functionality to do it manually. If I wanted to do it manually, I wouldn't have used the plugin in the first place. –  brentonstrine Oct 17 '13 at 18:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.