Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Look here:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    test p = new test();

    new Thread(() => p.SayHello("Thread One")).Start();
    new Thread(() => p.SayHello("Thread Two")).Start();
}

then:

class test
{
    public void SayHello(string data)
    {
        int i = 0;

        while (i < 50)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello from " + data);
            i++;
        }
    }
}

Why does second thread not reset the variable i to 0? and mess up the while loop which it is running on the first thread?

share|improve this question
    
It's no different to calling these methods synchronously. As a thread (any thread) enters the method, local variables are only available within the method. If they are hoisted out of the method, then it becomes a different story.. –  Simon Whitehead Oct 15 '13 at 21:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's because int i is a local variable. If you made it static to the class, rather than an local variable, it would be reset. The variable is isolated to each thread in this case.

Example:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    test p = new test();

    new Thread(() => p.SayHello("Thread One")).Start();
    new Thread(() => p.SayHello("Thread Two")).Start();
}

public class test
{
    static int i = 0;
    public static void SayHello(string data)
    {
        i = 0;

        while (i < 50)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Hello from " + data);
            i++;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The first sentence is correct here - but then you start talking about instance variables, which is a bit confusing when there aren't any... and if i were an instance variable, it would be problematic as there's only one instance. –  Jon Skeet Oct 15 '13 at 21:29
    
@JonSkeet thanks, I fixed it. Is that more accurate? –  Pheonixblade9 Oct 15 '13 at 21:31
    
Yes, that's better. –  Jon Skeet Oct 15 '13 at 21:34
    
@JonSkeet also added a code example of my verbal example –  Pheonixblade9 Oct 15 '13 at 21:36
    
An instance member would have the same problem in this case. –  Brian Rasmussen Oct 15 '13 at 21:52

i is a local variable, so each thread has its own copy of i.

share|improve this answer

Think of it as each thread getting it's own "copy" of the SayHello method with it's local variables. If you wanted both threads to use the same i, you'd have to pass it by reference, and then the fun would start.

share|improve this answer
1  
Perhaps you meant "by ref" ? –  Simon Whitehead Oct 15 '13 at 21:35
    
int is passed by value, so you would have to explicitly specify ref in order to get this to happen. –  Pheonixblade9 Oct 15 '13 at 21:37
    
Yes I did, fixed cheers. –  Tony Hopkinson Oct 15 '13 at 22:27

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.