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According to Apple's documentation(link)—

There are many situations where you may need to find existing objects (objects already saved in a store) for a set of discrete input values. A simple solution is to create a loop, then for each value in turn execute a fetch to determine whether there is a matching persisted object and so on. This pattern does not scale well. If you profile your application with this pattern, you typically find the fetch to be one of the more expensive operations in the loop (compared to just iterating over a collection of items). Even worse, this pattern turns an O(n) problem into an O(n^2) problem.

It is much more efficient—when possible—to create all the managed objects in a single pass, and then fix up any relationships in a second pass. For example, if you import data that you know does not contain any duplicates (say because your initial data set is empty), you can just create managed objects to represent your data and not do any searches at all. Or if you import "flat" data with no relationships, you can create managed objects for the entire set and weed out (delete) any duplicates before save using a single large IN predicate.

Question 1: Considering that my data I'm importing doesn't have any relationships, how do I implement what is described in the last line.

If you do need to follow a find-or-create pattern—say because you're importing heterogeneous data where relationship information is mixed in with attribute information—you can optimize how you find existing objects by reducing to a minimum the number of fetches you execute. How to accomplish this depends on the amount of reference data you have to work with. If you are importing 100 potential new objects, and only have 2000 in your database, fetching all of the existing and caching them may not represent a significant penalty (especially if you have to perform the operation more than once). However, if you have 100,000 items in your database, the memory pressure of keeping those cached may be prohibitive.

You can use a combination of an IN predicate and sorting to reduce your use of Core Data to a single fetch request.

Example code:

// Get the names to parse in sorted order.
NSArray *employeeIDs = [[listOfIDsAsString componentsSeparatedByString:@"\n"]
        sortedArrayUsingSelector: @selector(compare:)];

// create the fetch request to get all Employees matching the IDs
NSFetchRequest *fetchRequest = [[NSFetchRequest alloc] init];
[fetchRequest setEntity:
        [NSEntityDescription entityForName:@"Employee" inManagedObjectContext:aMOC]];
[fetchRequest setPredicate: [NSPredicate predicateWithFormat: @"(employeeID IN %@)", employeeIDs]];

// Make sure the results are sorted as well.
[fetchRequest setSortDescriptors:
    @[ [[NSSortDescriptor alloc] initWithKey: @"employeeID" ascending:YES] ]];
// Execute the fetch.
NSError *error;
NSArray *employeesMatchingNames = [aMOC executeFetchRequest:fetchRequest error:&error];

You end up with two sorted arrays—one with the employee IDs passed into the fetch request, and one with the managed objects that matched them. To process them, you walk the sorted lists following these steps:

Get the next ID and Employee. If the ID doesn't match the Employee ID, create a new Employee for that ID. Get the next Employee: if the IDs match, move to the next ID and Employee.

Question 2: In the above example, I get two sorted arrays as described above. Considering the worst case scenario where all the objects that are to be inserted are present in the store, I don't see anyway that I can solve the problem in O(n) time. Apple describes the two steps as above but that is an O(n^2) job. For any kth element in the input array, there might or might not exist an element that matches it in the first k elements in the output array. So in the worst case, the complexity will be O(nC2) = O(n^2).

So, what I believe Apple is doing is making sure that fetch only processes once even though there are O(n^2) checks required. If so, then I'll go with this; but is there any other way of doing this efficiently.

Please understand, that I don't want to fetch again and again - fetch once for an input array of size 100 identifiers.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Ad. 1 The fact of having relationships isn't important here. This explanation only says that if you download your data from e.g. a remote server and your items have some IDs, then you can fetch them all from the persistent store in one request, instead of fetching each object in a separate request.

Ad. 2

Apple describes the two steps as above but that is an O(n^2) job.

It's not. Please read these lines carefully:

To process them, you walk the sorted lists following these steps:

Get the next ID and Employee. If the ID doesn't match the Employee ID, create a new Employee for that ID. Get the next Employee: if the IDs match, move to the next ID and Employee.

You walk the arrays/lists simultaneously, so you never have to make this check: "there might or might not exist an element that matches it in the first k elements in the output array." You don't need to check previous elements as they're sorted and they certainly won't contain the object you're interested in.

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Ok I understand that and I was wrong. It's basically an O(n) process. But that still leaves part 1. How does one accomplish this — > Or if you import "flat" data with no relationships, you can create managed objects for the entire set and weed out (delete) any duplicates before save using a single large IN predicate. –  flippex17 Oct 17 '13 at 0:24
1  
@flippex17: I think what they mean is this. You insert managed objects into a context. Then you grab IDs (or other identifiers) of these objects, put them into IN predicate and fetch array of the objects from the persistent store (objects that you've just inserted won't be fetched, because they're not yet saved). Then you iterate through NSManagedObjectContext's insertedObjects and delete objects that were found in the persistent store. It's basically what I wrote in my answer, just implemented in the different order. –  Arkadiusz Holko Oct 17 '13 at 7:25
1  
@flippex17: It didn't fit in my previous comment: you also have to convert the array (fetch array of the objects) into an NSDictionary indexed by your IDs to get amortized O(1) lookup. –  Arkadiusz Holko Oct 17 '13 at 7:37
    
When you say fetch array, you mean something like this: NSArray *matches = [self.managedObjectContext executeFetchRequest:fetchRequest error:&error]; I am not a pro, but I am just wondering how would one convert this to NSDictionary indexed by IDs given testID is one of the fields of the managed Object of type ATest. Sorry if this is an easy question but something I am unable to solve. –  flippex17 Oct 17 '13 at 8:09
1  
@flippex17: yes, that's what I meant by fetching an array. You can get NSDictionary like this: NSMutableDictionary *mutableDict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init]; for (ATest *test in matches) { mutableDict[test.testID] = test; } –  Arkadiusz Holko Oct 17 '13 at 8:16

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