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I'm using Pytest to test hardware via Python models.

My current conftest setup allows me to instantiate the Python model via funcargs, which I like.

def test_part1(target):
    ...

def test_part2(target):
    ...

etc.

My models have a deep, but simple single-inheritance structure:

class A():
    def __init__:
        self.attributes_added_by_class_A
        ...

class B(A):
    def __init__:
        super().__init__()
        self.attributes_added_by_class_B
        ...

etc.

My pytests currently look like this:

def test_part1(target):
    call_test_for_attributes_set_by_class_A(target)
    call_test_for_attributes_set_by_class_B(target)
    call_tests_specific_to_part1(target)

def test_part2(target):
    call_test_for_attributes_set_by_class_A(target)
    call_test_for_attributes_set_by_class_B(target)
    call_tests_specific_to_part2(target)

...

I would like to avoid the need for repeating call_test_for_attributes_set_by_class_A(target), etc.

How can I organize/create my pytests so that I'm not constantly re-writing code to test attributes common to each target via their inheritance? In other words, if Part1 and Part2 both inherit from Class A, they both have attributes assigned by Class A.

Is there some way I could use Python's class inheritance structure to allow my pytests to reflect the same inheritance as my objects? In other words, is something like the following possible?

class PytestA():
    def test_attributes_set_by_class_A()

class PytestB(PytestA):
    def test_attributes_set_by_class_B()

test_all = PytestB(target)

I'm stuck trying to figure out how the above would receive the target argument as __init__() is now allowed (?) in pytest classes.

I'm using Python3

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Why are you running the classA/classB tests more than once? Is this unit testing, or something else? –  Austin Hastings Oct 16 '13 at 3:40
    
@Austin Hastings: These are models of hardware. Each type of hardware is slightly different, but all share various common characteristics. Those common characteristics are encapsulated in the parent classes, ClassA, ClassB, etc. –  JS. Oct 16 '13 at 17:16

1 Answer 1

I think you want a fixture that depends on another fixture. See Modularity: using fixtures from a fixture function. Perhaps you want a generic target fixture, then a targetA fixture, and a targetB fixture. I don't entirely understand how your tests are working so I'm hesitant to give an example based on what you've written.

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