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I would like to use D to create a RESTful web application. What are the most actively maintained and contributed projects that are worth considering? A short comparison of these web frameworks with pluses and minuses will be nice.
My search lead me to only one project, which seems like an excellent framework: vibed (http://vibed.org/) Are there other projects which are minimal in nature like sinatra?

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Unfortunately such "shopping" questions are not best-suited for SO. –  user2864740 Oct 16 '13 at 2:24
    
I am not really shopping for frameworks. There are umpteen questions on comparison of Java web frameworks and ditto for Python, Ruby, etc. And I believe being an excellent language, D deserves to have a stackoverflow question on comparison of its web frameworks. –  Salil Oct 16 '13 at 2:34
    
I don't think those questions are fitting either. But they are what they are and do exist. I think this would be more fitting for an Info page on the D tag (the research done; and informative links posted, not a question). –  user2864740 Oct 16 '13 at 2:37
    
I do not think that comparison questions should be on a language web site instead of on stackoverflow. D info page can list the web frameworks written in D, (which is what Haskell's info page does). But, people who have actively studied and used the frameworks, that is programmers, can tell others about the advantages and disadvantages of each. If one is looking for a laundry list of packages/frameworks, the language's info page is better, but not for comparison. –  Salil Oct 16 '13 at 2:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

At the moment of writing this text there is no framework for building true RESTful web services that I know of. However, you should be able to easily build one on top of vibe.d or Adam's web modules that he already mentioned above.

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I actually did play with the idea of having urls map to objects and the verbs go through: web.d also includes an ApiObject class which goes: /obj/name -> new Obj("name"); and then calls the appropriate methods on it. So GET /obj/name calls (new Obj("name")).GET();, same for POST, PUT, etc. Then /obj/name/foo calls (new Obj("name").foo(); with the same rules as I described for functions above. But I don't use it as much as the plain functions for one because it is still somewhat buggy.... and it is still somewhat buggy because I don't use it enough to sit down and fit it all! lol –  Adam D. Ruppe Oct 16 '13 at 13:55
    
note that i just edited some stuff about the ApiObject functionality into my answer –  Adam D. Ruppe Oct 16 '13 at 14:19
    
Note the word true in front of the term RESTFul... ;) I humbly believe 60% of frameworks and APIs that put REST in their descriptions are not truly REST... Do not get me wrong, I do not think it is bad, just that true RESTfulness is hard... –  DejanLekic Oct 16 '13 at 14:41

I've heard good things about vibe.d http://vibed.org/

Though, I've never personally used it because I wrote my own libraries well before vibe came out. https://github.com/adamdruppe/misc-stuff-including-D-programming-language-web-stuff

vibe is better documented, so you might be better off going there, but here's how my libraries work:

cgi.d is the base web interface (use -version=embedded_httpd when compiling to use its own web server instead of CGI if you want), and I offer some RESTy stuff in a separate file called web.d. It depends on cgi.d, dom.d, characterencodings.d, and sha.d. You might also want database.d and mysql.d for connecting to a mysql database.

The way web.d works is you just write functions and it automatically maps them to url and formats data.

http://arsdnet.net/cgi-bin/apidemo/add-some-numbers

The source code to that portion is:

import arsd.web;
class MySite : ApiProvider {
     export int addSomeNumbers(int a, int b) { return a+b; }
}
mixin FancyMain!MySite;

web.d automatically generates the form you see there, parses the url into the types given, and formats the return value into either html, json, or sometimes other things (for example, objects can be made into tables).

There is also an envelopeFormat url param that can wrap it in more json, best for machine consumption: http://arsdnet.net/cgi-bin/apidemo/add-some-numbers?a=1&b=2&format=json&envelopeFormat=json

web.d.php in my github shows one way you can consume it, and web.d itself automatically generates javascript functions to call from the client:

MySite.addSomeNumbers(10, 20).get(function(answer) { alert("Server replied: " + answer); });

answer would be of the type returned by the D function.

If you don't want/need the automatic function wrapping, cgi.d alone gives access to the basic info and writing functions:

void requestHandler(Cgi cgi) {
    // there's cgi.get["name"], cgi.post["name"], or cgi.request("name"), kinda like php
    cgi.write("hello ", cgi.request("name"));
}
mixin GenericMain!requestHandler;

But yeah, most the documentation that exists for my library is just me talking about it on forums... I think once you've done one function it isn't hard to figure out, but I'm biased!

edit: copy/paste from my comment below since it is pretty relevant to really getting RESTy:

I actually did play with the idea of having urls map to objects and the verbs go through: web.d also includes an ApiObject class which goes: /obj/name -> new Obj("name"); and then calls the appropriate methods on it. So GET /obj/name calls (new Obj("name")).GET();, same for POST, PUT, etc. Then /obj/name/foo calls (new Obj("name").foo(); with the same rules as I described for functions above.

But I don't use it as much as the plain functions for one because it is still somewhat buggy.... and it is still somewhat buggy because I don't use it enough to sit down and fit it all! lol

You use it by writing an ApiObject class and then aliasing it into the ApiProvider:

import arsd.web;
class MySite : ApiProvider {
     export int addSomeNumbers(int a, int b) { return a+b; }
     alias MyObject obj; // new, brings in MyObject as /obj/xxx/
}

And, of course, define the object:

class MyObject : ApiObject {
    CoolApi parent;
    string identifier;
    this(CoolApi parent, string identifier) {
    this.parent = parent;
    this.identifier = identifier;

    /* you might also want to load any existing object from a database or something here, using the identifier string, and initialize other members */
    // for now to show the example, we'll just initialize data with dummy info

    data.id = 8;
    data.name = "MyObject/" ~ identifier;
    }

    /* define some members as a child struct so we can return them later */
    struct Data {
    int id;
    string name;
    Element makeHtmlElement() {
        // for automatic formatting as html
        auto div = Element.make("div");
        import std.conv;
        div.addChild("span", to!string(id)).addClass("id");
        div.appendText(" ");
        div.addChild("span", name).addClass("name");
        return div;
    }
    }

    Data data;

    export Data GET() {
    return data;
    }

    export Data POST(string name) {
    parent.ensureGoodPost(); // CSRF token check

    data.name = name;
    // normally, you'd commit the changes to the database and redirect back to GET or something like that, but since we don't have a db we'll just return the modified object

    return data;
    }

// property accessors for the data, if you want
    export int id() {
    return data.id;
    }
}

mixin FancyMain!MySite;

Then you can access it:

http://arsdnet.net/cgi-bin/apidemo2/obj/cool/

BTW the trailing slash is mandatory: this is one of the outstanding bugs I haven't gotten around to fixing yet. (The trailing slash code is more complicated than it should be, making this harder to fix that it might look.)

Anyway, you can see the object rendered itself as html via makeHtmlElement. This is a good time to showcase other formats:

http://arsdnet.net/cgi-bin/apidemo2/obj/cool/?format=table

table, also try csv, and of course, json

http://arsdnet.net/cgi-bin/apidemo2/obj/cool/?format=json

or for machine consumption: http://arsdnet.net/cgi-bin/apidemo2/obj/cool/?format=json&envelopeFormat=json

and the property is available too: http://arsdnet.net/cgi-bin/apidemo2/obj/cool/id

Another major outstanding bug is that the automatically generated Javascript functions can't access child objects at all. They only work on functions on the top level ApiProvider. Another bug that is harder to fix than it might seem, and I'm not particularly driven to do so because the top-level functions can do it all anyway. Of course, you could make the URLs yourself on the xmlhttprequest and access it that way.

Let's also demo POST by slapping together a quick form:

http://arsdnet.net/cgi-bin/apidemo2/poster

you can submit something and see the POST handler indeed reset the name. (BTW note the action has that trailing slash: without it, it silently redirects you! I really should fix that.)

Anyway, bugs notwithstanding, the core of it works and might be the closest thing to full blown REST D has right now.

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another barely documented feature of cgi.d is you can test from the command line, so if you ran: "./apidemo2 GET /obj/cool/" it would show you the output right there. There's a comment in cgi.d on one of the constructors that explains some of the options. Search for "--cookie" in cgi.d and you'll see that comment. Other command line options are query string or POST params, depending on the method. –  Adam D. Ruppe Oct 16 '13 at 14:28
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I see you writing so much text about your framework, why not take the opportunity to answer a question and make documentation at the same time. Eventually you won't have to start with "vibe is better documented." –  he_the_great Oct 17 '13 at 2:06
    
yeah, I've been meaning to make a website and blog or something but haven't gotten around to it yet. I spend a lot of time answering questions but can't actually please myself with a website setup; I hate them all. –  Adam D. Ruppe Oct 17 '13 at 2:58

You can take a look at what I'm building. Still extremely alpha, but I'm attempting to build a Rails-like framework in D: http://jaredonline.github.io/action-pack/

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