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I have read that, the read function of a character device driver looks like

static ssize_t device_read(struct file *filp,   /* see include/linux/fs.h   */
               char *buffer,    /* buffer to fill with data */
               size_t length,   /* length of the buffer     */
               loff_t * offset)

My questions are

  1. These parameters are mandatory?
  2. Couldn't see *filp and *offset used in the sample driver. what is the use of that ?
  3. Where do the data for *buffer and *length actually come from? In the code it is said that buffer is in the user data segment. What does it mean actually?
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  1. These parameters are mandatory?

    No, these parameters are not mandatory. It all depends on how you want to implement your read operation. But yes, user space application has to pass everything whichever is required in read system call and then its up to driver that what driver wants to use.

  2. Couldn't see *filp and *offset used in the sample driver. what is the use of that ?

    That is because sample driver is not reading the actual device, it just reads the global char string. But in actual driver it reads some device. To inform driver on which device user space wants to read, *filp is used as a device identifier. Offset just gives position from where start to read on device.

  3. Where do the data for *buffer and *length actually come from? In the code it is said that buffer is in the user data segment. What does it mean actually?

    In actual scenario, data is read from device indicated by filp and that data goes to buffer and length is set accordingly. But in sample driver, instead of reading a device, it is just reading global char string for sake of simplicity. This *buffer is in user data segment, meaning user space application has allocated that buffer in its own data segment and it has passed its pointer to kernel space so kernel can pass data to user space application which driver has read from a device. put_user is used for appropriate transfer of data to user space buffer.

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Lets say a user process wants to read some data from a file using the read system call. The user process provides a file descriptor, a buffer where the data should be read into, and the number of bytes to read.

The file descriptor of the read call gets translated to a struct file * by the kernel. The buffer and length arguments are the buffer and byte-count provided by the user process.

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