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Which of these methods, or others, is best to use to display files?
Note: In this example I'm only interested in displaying filenames

Also, How are items in FilesystemIterator sorted?

The following three examples both display the same results, except that FilesystemIterator has no apparent sort order.

$path = "/";
exec("ls $path", $results);
foreach($results as $file){
    p($file);
}

foreach(glob($path."/*") as $file){
    p(basename($file)   );
}

foreach(new FilesystemIterator($path) as $file){
    p($file->getFilename());
}


function p($s){
    global $path;
    echo "<a href=\"$path?f=$s\">$s</a><BR>\n";
}

Output:

exec("ls ...") method
bin
boot
cdrom
dev
etc
home
initrd.img
...


glob() method
bin
boot
cdrom
dev
etc
home
initrd.img
...


FilesystemIterator() method
mnt
vmlinuz
cdrom
usr
sys
home
var
...
share|improve this question

How about this :

exec() - is the worst possible solution, because it create potentional security hole in your application, if user can manage enter custom string in exec input parameter. For this reason most hostings prevent you from using exec, so if you will be deploying your app to some hosting you don't own, this command can be blocked.

glob(), opendir/readdir solutions are just fine, same as FilesystemIterator. This is on you, what will you choose. Pros and cons are these :

functions, such as glob, opendir/readdir consume less memory, because no objects are created, you simple get an array of string values. This can be good, if you are sure, that only thing you'll need is list of paths in your filesystem.

FilesystemIterator gives you collection of SplFileInfo objects, which provide handfull set of methods for every item, such as getExtension, getFullPath, getFilename, which makes performing some advanced tasks with files/folders quite easy.

Ps.: So best in terms of usability is OOP approach via FilesystemIterator, because you get objects, wich holds or can get many information about target file/folder, in terms of simplicity you can choose calling functions, such as glob

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm also not asking about security issues involving exec() – ElefantPhace Oct 16 '13 at 6:12
1  
I just thought it will be good mention them ... – apocalypz Oct 16 '13 at 6:17
1  
If you'd bother giving a qualified definition of "best" you would get better answers... – Ulrich Eckhardt Oct 16 '13 at 19:09

I'm not sure about the pros and cons about the methods you've given, but PHP does provide you with a set of functions to deal with directories.

http://www.php.net/manual/en/ref.dir.php

Quick sample:

$dh = opendir("path/to/folder");
while (($file = readdir($dh)) !== false) {
    // filename will be in $file, will include "." and ".."
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is the exact same output as FilesystemIterator except with dots – ElefantPhace Oct 16 '13 at 6:03
1  
it is not, FilesystemIterator returns collection of SplFileObject(s) – apocalypz Oct 16 '13 at 6:09
    
As far as outputting only filenames, as I am doing, there is nothing different with this – ElefantPhace Oct 16 '13 at 6:11
    
lol, output is the same, so nothing different ... so array of strings == array of objects, that's what you saying ? – apocalypz Oct 16 '13 at 6:14

Whenever you ask for "best", you need to define the criteria, so your main question can't be answered.

Some notes though:

  • Concerning the order in the iterator, I guess that it simply doesn't sort the files in any way but delivers them in the way they are stored on disk. This is probably the same as what opendir()/readdir() (is there a closedir() in PHP, btw?) are doing. Not sorting it makes sense: When you are going to sort it again by a different attribute anyway or don't need it sorted at all, you don't waste CPU cycles.
  • Concerning the first (exec(..)), that creates a new process (which is expensive), runs a program (that isn't even present on every system but only POSIX-style ones) and then returns the output as a single string, which you need to parse in order to get single files. Further, straight ls will filter out hidden files all by itself.
  • Globbing with a wildcard is also rather expensive, in particular if you don't want to filter things at all.

I'd use a directory iterator by default, sorting it as necessary, unless some requirements (those that you didn't mention yet) tell otherwise.

share|improve this answer
    
with exec() if arg2/$output is supplied the given array will be filled with every line of output by the command, which is what I'm doing – ElefantPhace Oct 16 '13 at 6:08

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