Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a string variable

static String[] genrename;

I am assigning values to it in one of my method and then displaying its content. It does store the value fine. But when I am accessing the String variables directly or from a getter method(). It shows a null value in the string.

Any ideas?

public class GenreParsing {
    static int entries;
    static String[] genrecode;
    static String[] genrename;
    public GenreParsing() {
    }
    public void parsing(String returnContent) {
        try {
            JSONObject jo_genres = new JSONObject(returnContent);
            System.out.println(jo_genres);
            JSONArray ja_genres = jo_genres.getJSONArray("genres");
            System.out.println(ja_genres);
            entries=ja_genres.length();
            for (int i = 1; i < entries; i++) {
                JSONObject jo_genre = (JSONObject) ja_genres.get(i);
                JSONArray ja_genre = jo_genre.getJSONArray("genre");
                JSONObject genreinfo = (JSONObject) ja_genre.get(0);
                genrecode = new String[entries];
                genrename = new String[entries];
                genrecode[i] = genreinfo.getString("code");
                genrename[i] = genreinfo.getString("name");
                System.out.println(genrecode[i]);
                System.out.println(genrename[i]);
            }
        }
        catch (JSONException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } 
    }
    public int no_of_entries() {
        System.out.println(entries);
        return entries;
    }
    public String getgenrecode(int x) {
        System.out.print(genrecode[x]);
        return genrecode[x];
    }
    public String getgenrename(int y) {
        return genrename[y];
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
It is much easier if you show us the code. – Thomas Jung Dec 21 '09 at 11:43
5  
There's a bug in your code. That's all we can say without looking at it. – Michael Borgwardt Dec 21 '09 at 11:44
5  
1  
You've clearly not understood what new new String[entries] actually does. Also, you seem to be confused about proper use of static. Peter Lang and Thomas Jung are pointing you in the right direction. – bendin Dec 21 '09 at 12:10
1  
@bendin, I'm all for fixing "fugly" code (as you so eloquently put it) but not when that changes the actual meaning of the code. The removal of the empty constructor and print statements should not have been done (in my opinion) - I've put them back and beautified the code without changing its nature. – paxdiablo Dec 21 '09 at 12:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why are you doing genrecode=new String[entries]; and genrename=new String[entries]; inside the loop? This creates a new string array every single time through the loop, invalidating the previous assignments.

Try this instead:

genrecode=new String[entries];
genrename=new String[entries];
for(int i = 0; i < entries; i++) {
    JSONObject jo_genre = (JSONObject) ja_genres.get(i);
    JSONArray ja_genre=jo_genre.getJSONArray("genre");
    JSONObject genreinfo = (JSONObject) ja_genre.get(0);
    genrecode[i]= genreinfo.getString("code");
    genrename[i] = genreinfo.getString("name");
    System.out.println(genrecode[i]);
    System.out.println(genrename[i]);
}

It creates a big-enough array up front and populates all the array elements. I've also changed the starting value for i in the above code because array indexes usually start at zero, not one. You may want to check that.

One final thing to watch out for is those statics. If your class is ever allocated as multiple instances, they may overwrite each other's data in that case (especially in a threaded program where you can't dictate sequencing easily). Making these private to an instance will prevent this.

Again, it depends on how you're using the class. If it's a singleton, it won't matter (yet), but I tend to plan ahead - you don't know when you may want to change it to a non-singleton and you lose nothing (in my opinion) using instance variables even for a singleton.

share|improve this answer

You're overwriting your array again and again by doing

genrecode=new String[entries];
genrename=new String[entries];

in the loop. Put this before the loop.

share|improve this answer

You should make all fields instance variables so multiple instances won't interfere.

public class GenreParsing {
 private int entries;
 private String[] genrecode;
 private String[] genrename;
}

Additionally it is always good style to ensure proper encapsulation by restricting the access to internal state of a class.

You should consider following the Java Coding conventions and handling the exceptions thrown properly.

share|improve this answer

maybe string[n] item is null, not the array itself.

share|improve this answer
    
No it outputs the value while I do System.out.println(genrecode[i]); inside the method where I save the data in the string – Bohemian Dec 21 '09 at 11:44
    
maybe your value somehow goes out of scope when you leave the method. – Matt Ellen Dec 21 '09 at 11:50
    
You mention genrecode[i] here but genrename[] in your question. Could this be related to your problem? – Carl Smotricz Dec 21 '09 at 11:52
    
no that was a sample. I have posted the detailed code. Just ignore the JSON part as I m gettin data for it frm some other class. – Bohemian Dec 21 '09 at 11:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.