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I'm sure people keep asking this, but why do I keep getting a TypeError code for my program?

The code below is called q1

def rect_bounds(x, y, px, py):
    x = 0
    y = 0
    px = 0
    py = 0

    if px < x and py < y:
        print("point is inside rectangle")
    elif px == x or py == y:
        print("point is on edge of rectangle")
    else:
        print("out of bounds")

    return x, y, px, py

This code is called q1_test

import q1

x = int(input("Enter the length in the x-direction: "))
y = int(input("Enter the length in the y-direction "))  
px = int(input("Enter a x-coordinate: "))
py = int(input("Enter a y-coordinate: "))
x, y, px, py = q1.rect_bounds(x, y, px, py) #error comes up here
print()

Basically the code is supposed to ask the user for a length in the x and y directions, then ask the user to input a x and y coordinate. The code then tells the user if the point is in the rectangle, on the edge of the rectangle, or outside of the rectangle altogether. I keep getting an error where I marked, but I can't figure out why that is.

The error:

Traceback (most recent call last): File "C:\Users\Michael\Dropbox\mdocs\CP104 Workspace\ostr1470_a9\src\q1_test.py", line 18, in <module> x, y, px, py = q1.rect_bounds(x, y, px, py) TypeError: 'NoneType' object is not iterable

The error doesn't come up anymore. Instead it returns: Enter the length in the x-direction: 5 Enter the length in the y-direction 5 Enter a x-coordinate: 2 Enter a y-coordinate: 2 point is on edge of rectangle

(which is it clearly is not)

share|improve this question
1  
Why would you not post the error itself? –  Asad Oct 16 '13 at 6:33
4  
That line is basically same as x, y, px, py = None. ; rect_bounds does not return. –  falsetru Oct 16 '13 at 6:34
    
good point. here is the error: –  user2885189 Oct 16 '13 at 6:34
    
Traceback (most recent call last): File "C:\Users\Michael\Dropbox\mdocs\CP104 Workspace\ostr1470_a9\src\q1_test.py", line 18, in <module> x, y, px, py = q1.rect_bounds(x, y, px, py) TypeError: 'NoneType' object is not iterable –  user2885189 Oct 16 '13 at 6:34
1  
What are the lower bounds of the rectangle? –  fvrghl Oct 16 '13 at 6:54

3 Answers 3

It looks like rect_bounds doesn't return anything. q1.rect_bounds(x, y, px, py) cannot be unpacked into the four variables x, y, px, py. You will get the same error if you try to do:

a, b, c, d = None

Also, in rect_bounds, you have:

x = 0
y = 0
px = 0
py = 0

This means that the arguments are always set to zero. You should get rid of these so that the function works as intended.

Also, assuming the other two boundaries of the rectangle are the x and y axis, you should add:

if px < x and py < y and 0 < x and 0 < y :
    print("point is inside rectangle")
elif px == x or py == y or px == 0 or py == 0:
    print("point is on edge of rectangle")

Replace 0 with the correct logic if the other boundaries of the rectangle are somewhere else.

share|improve this answer
    
Additionally, the OP should remove the lines where they set the arguments being passed in to zero (for unknown reasons). –  Asad Oct 16 '13 at 6:38
    
@Asad probably, but maybe OP knows best. I'll make a note of it in answer. –  fvrghl Oct 16 '13 at 6:39

You are not returning anything from your function, hence the result is not iterable.

>>> a,b,c,d = [1,2,3,4]
>>> a
1
>>> b
2
>>> x,y,z = None   # Your function also returns None
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
TypeError: 'NoneType' object is not iterable
share|improve this answer

Your question initially was that you were telling the caller that you were returning four things when you were actually returning none. You have since fixed that.

Let me go ahead and solve this programming problem for you. You seem to be confused and the help you were getting here wasn't really significant.

I will assume that one corner of your rectangle is (0,0) and the other one is (x,y).

x = int(input("Enter the length in the x-direction: "))
y = int(input("Enter the length in the y-direction "))  
px = int(input("Enter a x-coordinate: "))
py = int(input("Enter a y-coordinate: "))
if x>=0 && y>=0:
    r = rect_bounds(x,y,px,py);
    if r==0:
        print('the point is inside')
    elif r==1:
        print('the point is on the border')
    elif r==2:
        print('the point is on a corner (both borders)')
    elif r==3:
        print('the point is outside')


def rect_bounds(x,y,px,py):
    if (px>0 && py>0 && px<x && py<y):
        c = 0; #inside
    elif (px==x||px==0) && py>0 && py<y:
        c = 1; #on the border
    elif px>0 && px<x && (py==y || py==0):
        c = 1; #on border
    elif px==x && py==y:
        c = 2; #on corner
    elif px==x && py==0:
        c = 2; #on corner
    elif px==0 && py==y:
        c = 2; #on corner
    elif px==0 && py==0:
        c = 2; #on corner
    else:
        c = 3; #outside
    return c

Observe the practices I applied:

  • I do not print from my function rect_bounds, it just makes everything problematic and confusing. When you get more practice you will read about separating your library from your application.
  • I document all my cases and my assumptions (see for example 0,0 for one corner of the rectangle, and the length has to be positive) and double check everything. You will probably need to write test cases to make sure everything is right.
share|improve this answer
    
That function is now entirely pointless. –  Asad Oct 16 '13 at 6:37
    
Yeah well, what do you want? Does it not fix the error? –  carlosdc Oct 16 '13 at 6:38
    
@carlosdc It is an answer, but certainly not the best answer –  fvrghl Oct 16 '13 at 6:38
    
The goal of the function is to determine whether a point is within the bounds of rectangle defined by the arguments passed by the function. If it is to return anything, it should be a boolean value. Otherwise, it should simply print and not return anything. –  Asad Oct 16 '13 at 6:39
1  
All of the elif clauses where c is set to the same value can probably be condensed, but very good advice otherwise. Thanks for updating this. Also, please note that @ tags don't work in answers; if you want a user to be notified, please use a comment. –  Asad Nov 13 '13 at 5:41

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