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A theoretical question.. I have a virtual property in a class. Another class which extends that class, even though overrides the virtual property, seems to never actually override the base property's getter or setter methods. What am I missing?

class BaseClass
{
    protected string bla;

    public virtual string Bla
    {
        get { return this.bla; }
        set { this.bla = value; }
    }

    protected BaseClass() { } 

    public BaseClass(string _bla)
    {
        this.Bla = _bla;
    }
}

class ChildClass : BaseClass
{
    private string bla2;

    public override string Bla
    {
        get
        {
            return bla2;
        }
        set
        {
            bla2 = value;
        }
    }

    public ChildClass(string _bla2) : base("AAA")
    {
        this.Bla = _bla2;
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var c = new ChildClass("Me");

        Console.WriteLine(c.Bla);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

I think, I got the answer.

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2  
That code doesn't compile. You can't make the derived class's Bla property setter public if the base class's property setter is protected. Also ChildClass doesn't have a default constructor so var c = new ChildClass(); can't compile. – Matthew Watson Oct 16 '13 at 8:28
    
@VenkatRenukaPrasad Your code doesn't work. You can't change access modifires when overriding protected inherited members. – voo Oct 16 '13 at 8:29
    
Also a parameterless ChildClass constructor doesn't exist. – Ahmed KRAIEM Oct 16 '13 at 8:30
    
Fixing the "protected" issue, it works fine my end.. whether I declare c to be a var or a ChildClass. – Craig Graham Oct 16 '13 at 8:35
up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you fix up the code so that it compiles, it works as expected. However, pay attention to the comments that I added! You're calling a virtual method (a property setter, but still a method) from a constructor. That's bad.

using System;

namespace Demo
{
    class BaseClass
    {
        protected string bla;

        public virtual string Bla
        {
            get
            {
                return this.bla;
            }
            set
            {
                this.bla = value;
            }
        }

        protected BaseClass()
        {
        }

        public BaseClass(string _bla)
        {
            this.Bla = _bla;
        }
    }

    class ChildClass: BaseClass
    {
        private string bla2;

        public override string Bla
        {
            get
            {
                return bla2;
            }
            set
            {
                bla2 = value;
            }
        }

        public ChildClass(string _bla2)
            : base("AAA")
        {
            // Step into the next line of code in the debugger.
            // You'll see that it goes into the ChildClass.Bla setter.
            // However note that this is making a virtual call in a constructor 
            // - which is very bad if there is a further derived class because
            // it will call a method in that derived class before that derived
            // class has been constructed.
            // You can fix this potential problem by making this entire class
            // sealed or by making the property sealed in this class.

            this.Bla = _bla2; 
        }
    }

    class Program
    {
        private void run()
        {
            var c = new ChildClass("X");

        }

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            new Program().run();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That was clear. Thanks Matt. – Venkat Renuka Prasad Oct 16 '13 at 8:41

base("AAA") calls public BaseClass(string _bla) { this.Bla = _bla; } that sets the value of this.Bla (that in child class it's pointing to field bla2) to "AAA", so in public ChildClass(string _bla2) { this.Bla = _bla2; } this.Bla and bla2 is already assigned via the base constructors.

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I did a unit test with your code and it works, add in the child class:

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("bla = {0},bla2 ={1}", bla,bla2);
    }

Call this Method after setting the property.

You will see that bla=null and bla2="Something"

Edit As said in the comment, I had to change the level of visibility of the setter to public, removing the constructor in the child class

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