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I have two arrays with IPs. I want to combine them into a third array and apply an ascending ordering.

#!/bin/bash
#

dbip[0]=1.1.1.1
dbip[1]=1.1.1.2
dbip[2]=1.1.1.3
dbip[3]=1.1.1.4
dbip[4]=1.1.1.5
dbip[5]=1.1.1.10
dbip[6]=1.1.1.9

ngip[0]=1.1.1.5
ngip[1]=1.1.1.6
ngip[2]=1.1.1.7
ngip[3]=1.1.1.1
ngip[4]=1.1.1.11


#I am adding the dbip array into the final one
for (( i=0; i<${#dbip[@]}; i++ ))
do
        allip[$i]=${dbip[$i]}
done

#Remembering the no. of elements in the final array
var=${#allip[@]}
echo "$var"

#Adding the ngip array into the final one
for (( i=0; i<${#ngip[@]}; i++ ))
do
        allip[$var+$i]=${ngip[$i]}
done

#Printing the initial order of the elements in the array
echo "size= ${#allip[@]}"

for (( i=0; i<${#allip[@]}; i++ ))
do
        echo "${allip[$i]}"
done

#Sorting the array in ascending order
for (( i=0; i<${#allip[@]}; i++ ))
do
        for (( j=$i; j<${#allip[@]}; j++ ))
        do
                if [ allip[$i] \> allip[$j] ];
                then
                        aux=${allip[$i]}
                        allip[$i]=${allip[$j]}
                        allip[$j]=$aux;
                fi
        done
done

echo "###############################"

#Printing the final form of the array
for (( i=0; i<${#allip[@]}; i++ ))
do
        echo "${allip[$i]}"
done

Problem is that the output is not ordered in numerical or lexicographical way.

Output:

1.1.1.1
1.1.1.11
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.2
1.1.1.3
1.1.1.4
1.1.1.5
1.1.1.10
1.1.1.9
1.1.1.5
1.1.1.7
1.1.1.6

The output should be like this:

1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.2
1.1.1.3
.......
1.1.1.10
1.1.1.11

or like this

1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.10
1.1.1.11

so i can remove the duplicates later.

How can i do this in a pure programming way in bash. No pipes.

Note that IPs can be from different classes: 10.55.72.190, 10.55.70.1, 10.51.72.44, etc.

share|improve this question
2  
Is implementing Bubble Sort in Bash really better than using the "sort" program? –  John Zwinck Oct 16 '13 at 8:38
    
Yes, because i have 4 arrays. Two with IPS and two with Hostnames associated to the IPs. What i am doing to the IP arrays i need to do with Hostname arrays. –  user2878232 Oct 16 '13 at 8:55
1  
bash also supports associative arrays. –  anishsane Oct 16 '13 at 9:05
    
@Florin that makes your question very different and you should look to use associative arrays like anishane suggests. –  iiSeymour Oct 16 '13 at 9:37
    
@Florin, please update your question to reflect your real problem. "I need to sort a list of IPs without calling sort" isn't really your question, is it? –  glenn jackman Oct 16 '13 at 11:50

1 Answer 1

Here is "pure" bash:

dbip=( [0]=1.1.1.1 [1]=1.1.1.2 [2]=1.1.1.3 [3]=1.1.1.4 [4]=1.1.1.5 [5]=1.1.1.10 [6]=1.1.1.9 )
ngip=( [0]=1.1.1.5 [1]=1.1.1.6 [2]=1.1.1.7 [3]=1.1.1.1 [4]=1.1.1.11 )
allip=( $(printf "%s\n" "${dbip[@]}" "${ngip[@]}" | sort -V) )
printf "%s\n" "${allip[@]}"
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.1
1.1.1.2
1.1.1.3
1.1.1.4
1.1.1.5
1.1.1.5
1.1.1.6
1.1.1.7
1.1.1.9
1.1.1.10
1.1.1.11
share|improve this answer
    
I was just about answer with sort -V luckily I spotted that's what you are using +1 (I wouldn't call it pure bash however). Also worth noting -V requires GNU sort. –  iiSeymour Oct 16 '13 at 9:34
    
I would be a complete waste of time (pun intended) to implement a sorting algorithm in a shell language. –  glenn jackman Oct 16 '13 at 10:02
    
Completely agree! It looks like the OP didn't ask the right question for the problem they are trying to solve any way, see the comments. –  iiSeymour Oct 16 '13 at 10:17
    
I am asking the right question. All i need is the order in the array to be like glenn posted. Can it be done or not ? –  user2878232 Oct 16 '13 at 10:27
    

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