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I am literally confused with the java with regard to interface : following is the interface I have :

interface shape
 {
     public   String baseclass="shape";

     public void Draw();     

 }

likewise I can have any number of interface and another class can implement any number be interface but the implementing class has to implement all the method provided by the interface.

the only advantage I could see is having some common properties and share them across class.

Instead of implementing interface the class can declare the method and use it and this also will work fine.

so why do wee need interface in java? even if it is for multiple inheritance, the interface is not having implementation but the method signature alone.

I am really confused with these and of course the famous abstract class too.

thanks.

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4  
go through on polymorphism – gjman2 Oct 16 '13 at 9:57
    
    
I expected down vote for this and I am even sure to get many but never bothered as this is the right place to ask this question – Java Questions Oct 16 '13 at 10:08
    
@Anto Why not Google instead of down votes? – Steve M Jul 31 '14 at 1:53

The main reason I see it used is to expose functions in things like a library, e.g. all you have to provide is the functions and a library jar and then a user of your library can use the functions without seeing your implementation.

There are heaps of other reasons as well, see polymorphism:

http://www.artima.com/objectsandjava/webuscript/PolymorphismInterfaces1.html

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/IandI/polymorphism.html

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the library jar reason – darknight Sep 23 '14 at 5:17

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