Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a program that creates two worker threads like the following:

void *Producer(void *threadarg){
    while (!terminate_producer){ //do something}
    printf("Producer: finalizing thread\n");
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

void *Consumer(void *threadarg){
    while (!terminate_consumer){ //do something}
    printf("Consumer: finalizing thread\n");
    pthread_exit(NULL);
}

// Initialize array of the worker threads
void initFuncArray(long result[])
{
    result[0] = (long)&Producer;
    result[1] = (long)&Consumer;
}

// The main method
int main (int argc, char* argv[]){
    long th_funcs[CPUS_NUM];
    initFuncArray(th_funcs);
    // threads data
    pthread_t tid[CPUS_NUM];
    thread_data prod_th_data[CPUS_NUM];
    bool pt = false;
    for (int i=0;i<CPUS_NUM;i++){
        prod_th_data[i].thread_id = i;
        pt = pthread_create(&tid[i], NULL, (void *)th_funcs[i], (void*)&prod_th_data[i]);
        if (pt) return -1;
    }
    sleep(5);
    terminate_producer = true;
    pthread_join (tid[0], NULL);
    **sleep(1);**
    terminate_consumer = true;
    pthread_join (tid[1], NULL);

    // Exiting the main thread
    return 0;
}

My question is about a call to sleep before terminating the consumer thread. If I do not have this call, the program terminates normally. However, if I have that sleep, the program never terminates. I see the message that the producer thread terminates, but I do not get the message from the consumer thread. What might be the problem?

Following suggestions I modified the code as follows, however, the problem now appears even without a call to sleep in-between:

typedef void (*func_type) (void *);
pthread_mutex_t terminate_producer;
pthread_mutex_t terminate_consumer;

void *Producer(void *threadarg){
    while (pthread_mutex_trylock(&terminate_producer)){ //do something}
    printf("Producer: finalizing thread\n");
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&terminate_producer);
    return NULL;
}

void *Consumer(void *threadarg){
    while (pthread_mutex_trylock(&terminate_consumer))
    printf("Consumer: finalizing thread\n");
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&terminate_consumer);
    return NULL;
}

// Initialize array of the worker threads
void initFuncArray(func_type result[])
{
    result[0] = Producer;
    result[1] = Consumer;
}

// The main method
int main (int argc, char* argv[]){
    func_type th_funcs[CPUS_NUM];
    initFuncArray(th_funcs);
    // threads data
    pthread_t tid[CPUS_NUM];
    thread_data prod_th_data[CPUS_NUM];

    // Using mutexes as termination condition
    pthread_mutex_init(&terminate_producer,NULL);
    pthread_mutex_init(&terminate_consumer,NULL);
    pthread_mutex_lock(&terminate_producer);
    pthread_mutex_lock(&terminate_consumer);

    bool pt = false;
    for (int i=0;i<CPUS_NUM;i++){
        prod_th_data[i].thread_id = i;
        pt = pthread_create(&tid[i], NULL, (void *)th_funcs[i], (void*)&prod_th_data[i]);
        if (pt) return -1;
    }
    sleep(5);
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&terminate_producer);
    pthread_join (tid[0], NULL);

    pthread_mutex_unlock(&terminate_consumer);
    pthread_join (tid[1], NULL);

    // Exiting the main thread
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Is terminate_producer atomic type? If not, than you have a data race. –  zch Oct 16 '13 at 11:40
    
Not the cause of your issue, but you declare two flags, terminate_producer and terminate_consumer, yet both threads only use terminate_producer. –  mah Oct 16 '13 at 11:43
    
Sorry, I corrected the mistakes appeared due to copy/pasting ... –  NeoSer Oct 16 '13 at 11:45
    
@zch: what do you mean by atomic type? Since both threads do not change the value of termination variables, how data race can occur? –  NeoSer Oct 16 '13 at 11:47
    
@NeoSer, data race occurs when one thread writes and another writes or reads. In your case main writes and others read. –  zch Oct 16 '13 at 11:51

2 Answers 2

It could be due to the compiler heuristically concluding (as an optimization) that terminate_consumer is a variable which is only read in the consumer thread, so it "caches" it in a register and never reads it.

Can you change the declarations of terminate_producer and terminate_consumer to:

volatile int terminate_producer;
volatile int terminate_consumer;

.. and try again?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I tried it but the result is the same :( –  NeoSer Oct 16 '13 at 12:14
    
It's a tricky one. Is there something in the consumer loop which resets the terminate_consumer variable, or prevents it from ever being read? –  Ivan Voras Oct 16 '13 at 12:26
    
No. The producer and the consumer threads just check the value on the respective termination variables in the loop condition and the termination variables do not appear in their bodies. –  NeoSer Oct 16 '13 at 13:13
    
Your last modifications (with mutexes for terminate_xxx) are definitely wrong. You are now blocking on a locked mutex in each of those threads, not doing any work at all. Your original idea, with int's for terminate_xxx was valid, and it is very suspicious that it doesn't work - this is why I think there's something wrong somewhere else and not in those variables by themselves. Could you simply paste your exact code (with int's for terminate_xxx) on pastebin (pastebin.com) or some similar service? –  Ivan Voras Oct 17 '13 at 8:27

Flag terminate_producer represents a critical section. Producers are reading its value and main thread is rewriting it at the same time. Access to this flag should be protected with some synchronization mechanism such as mutex:

inline stopProducers() {
    /* GET LOCK */
    terminate_producer = 1;
    /* RELEASE LOCK */
}

inline unsigned char shouldProduce() {
    unsigned char terminate = 0;
    /* GET LOCK */
    terminate = terminate_producer;
    /* RELEASE LOCK */
    return !terminate;
}

void *Producer(void *threadarg){
    while (shouldProduce()){ /* do something */ }
    printf("Producer: finalizing thread\n");
    return NULL;  // <-- use return instead of pthread_exit
}

and in main you would call stopProducers(); instead of rewriting the flag;

share|improve this answer
    
I think, it would be a problem if the main and the thread tried to write a value to terminate_producer at the same time. However, one is writing while the other one is reading. Thus, in the worst case the thread reads irrelevant data but terminates on the next iteration. The main will wait for the producer to finish before terminating the consumer in any case because of pthread_join ... –  NeoSer Oct 16 '13 at 11:53
    
In case of using, e.g., mutexes, I do not need 'terminate' variable at all. I can simply check if a mutex is available and if so, terminate the thread (as in the code above). –  NeoSer Oct 16 '13 at 14:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.