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I'm in need of some help with an issue. I am trying to load my list of 2000 proxies from a text file, but my class only fills 1040 array indexes with what it read on each line.

I'm not sure what to do. :(

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.FileNotFoundException;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;

public class ProxyLoader {

private String[] lineSplit = new String[100000];
private static String[] addresses = new String[100000];
private static int[] ports = new int[100000];
public int i = 0;

public ProxyLoader() {
    readData();
}

public synchronized String getAddr(int i) {
    return this.addresses[i];
}

public synchronized int getPort(int i) {
    return this.ports[i];
}

public synchronized void readData() {
    try {
        BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(
                new FileReader("./proxy.txt"));
        String line = "";

        try {
            while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {

                lineSplit = line.split(":");
                i++;

                addresses[i] = lineSplit[0];
                ports[i] = Integer.parseInt(lineSplit[1]);
                System.out.println("Line Number [" + i + "]  Adr: "
                        + addresses[i] + " Port: " + ports[i]);
            }

            for (String s : addresses) {
                if (s == null) {
                    s = "127.0.0.1";
                }
            }

            for (int x : ports) {
                if (x == 0) {
                    x = 8080;
                }
            }

        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    } catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}

}
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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Oct 16 '13 at 11:54

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

1  
How do you call the method? Do you swallow/ignore any exceptions? –  assylias Oct 16 '13 at 6:48
1  
There are a number of problems with the code, but the specific problem you're having sounds like an issue with the content of the file, maybe line 1041 can't be parsed properly? What is the exception that you get? –  John Bickers Oct 16 '13 at 8:28
1  
Having large arrays like that is not ideal. Your error probably isn't caused by this, but still it is not best practice. You're asking the JVM for 3 continuous free spaces of 391kb each. You might should consider using LinkedLists or simply handling the information as you're reading it. –  Neil Oct 16 '13 at 10:49
    
Have you ever heard that splitting/parsing may fail? Please post lines 1035 to 1045 of ./proxy.txt. Btw, you do not use index 0 of your arrays, there is lots of dead code (the 2 for loops in readData) and you don't close your files. –  Ingo Oct 16 '13 at 12:18
1  
new String[100000] ==== MEGA PERFORMANCE ISSUE . especially because it is a string –  Srinath Ganesh Oct 16 '13 at 15:46

2 Answers 2

Lets start by tidying up your code, there's quite a few problems that could be causing you trouble. Without the relevant parts of your proxy file, however, it's not possible for us to test or replicate the behavior you're seeing. Consider creating and posting an SSCCE, rather than just a code snippet.

  1. Properly indent/format your code.
  2. These methods don't (shouldn't) need to be synchronized - reading from an array in a multi-threaded environment is safe, and you should never be constructing multiple instances of ProxyLoader on different threads, meaning synchronized on readData() is simply wasteful.
  3. Creating massive arrays is a very poor way to store this data - it's wasteful to allocate that much extra memory, and your code will now fail should the file being loaded ever happen to be larger than the constant size you set. Use a scalable data structure such as an ArrayList or a Map.
  4. You store the address and port in separate arrays, using an object to hold both values will save memory and prevent data inconsistencies.
  5. Your public int i variable is dangerous - presumably you're using it to represent the maximum number of lines loaded, but this should be avoided in place of a size() method - as a public instance variable, anyone using the class could change this value, and i is a poor name for the variable, max is a better option.
  6. You likely don't want readData() to be public, as calling it more than once would do very strange things (it would load the file up again, starting at i, filling your arrays with duplicate data). Best idea would be to load the data directly in the constructor (or in a private method called by the constructor), this way the file only gets loaded up once for every instance of ProxyLoader created.
  7. You're creating a massive empty array lineSplit, then replacing it with the result of String.split(). This is confusing and wasteful, use a local variable to hold the split line instead.
  8. You aren't closing the file after you read it, which can cause memory leaks or other inconsistencies with the data. Using the try-with-resources syntax helps make this easy.
  9. You loop over the whole array of strings and ports after populating them, filling the remaining slots with what's essentially noise. It's unclear what you're trying to accomplish by doing this, but I'm certain it's a poor plan.

I suggest the following implementation:

import java.io.BufferedReader;
import java.io.FileReader;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Iterator;

public class ProxyLoader implements Iterable<ProxyLoader.Proxy> {
  // Remove DEFAULT_PROXY if not needed
  private static final Proxy DEFAULT_PROXY = new Proxy("127.0.0.1", 8080);
  private static final String DATA_FILE = "./proxy.txt";
  private ArrayList<Proxy> proxyList = new ArrayList<>();

  public ProxyLoader() {
    // Try-with-resources ensures file is closed safely and cleanly
    try(BufferedReader br = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(DATA_FILE))) {
      String line;
      while ((line = br.readLine()) != null) {
        String[] lineSplit = line.split(":");
        Proxy p = new Proxy(lineSplit[0], Integer.parseInt(lineSplit[1]));
        proxyList.add(p);
      }
    } catch (IOException e) {
      System.err.println("Failed to open/read "+DATA_FILE);
      e.printStackTrace(System.err);
    }
  }

  // If you request a positive index larger than the size of the file, it will return
  // DEFAULT_PROXY, since that's the behavior your original implementation
  // essentially did.  I'd suggest deleting DEFAULT_PROXY, having this method simply
  // return proxyList.get(i), and letting it fail if you request an invalid index.
  public Proxy getProxy(int i) {
    if(i < proxyList.size()) {
      return proxyList.get(i);
    } else {
      return DEFAULT_PROXY;
    }
  }

  // Lets you safely get the maximum index, without exposing the list directly
  public int getSize() {
    return proxyList.size();
  }

  // lets you run for(Proxy p : proxyLoader) { ... }
  @Override
  public Iterator<Proxy> iterator() {
    return proxyList.iterator();
  }

  // Inner static class just to hold data
  // can be pulled out into its own file if you prefer
  public static class Proxy {
    // note these values are public; since they're final, this is safe.
    // Using getters is more standard, but it adds a lot of boilerplate code
    // somewhat needlessly; for a simple case like this, public final should be fine.
    public final String address;
    public int port;

    public Proxy(String a, int p) {
      address = a;
      port = p;
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I've found that prettyprinter.de is an acceptable site for people that don't otherwise have access to a code formatter in an IDE (for some reason). Might be useful to link in your answer. –  MichaelT Oct 16 '13 at 15:17
1  
Thanks for the link, but I don't think it's too much to expect any programmer, regardless of the editor they use, to properly format their code. Poorly formatted code is a very common source of bugs; fixing their formatting only when they go to share it is too late. –  dimo414 Oct 16 '13 at 15:33

I've included some examples that may not exactly fit your use case, but show some ways to write code that is a bit easier to maintain and read.

Code that is hard to read, it hard to debug and maintain.

  • Objects need to validate their input (constructor args).
  • Reject bad data. Fail fast not later when it is harder to debug.
  • Never catch exceptions unless you can recover. Either soften it (wrap in a runtime and re-throw it), or add it to your throws clause. If you don't know what to do with it, do nothing.
  • Never eat an exception. Re-throw it or handle it.
  • Your code holds on to state it does not need.
  • Classes are a bit more self describing than two arrays of gak.
  • Avoid public vars. Unless they are final.
  • Protect the state of your objects.
  • Think about how your methods are going to get called, and avoid side effects. Calling readData twice would cause weird hard-to-debug side effects
  • Memory is cheap but not free. Don't instantiate large arrays you don't need.
  • If you open it, you have to close it.

Java 7 and 8 allow you to read lines from the FileSystem so there is no need to write most of this code to start with:

 Path thePath = FileSystems.getDefault().getPath(location);
 return Files.readAllLines(thePath, Charset.forName("UTF-8"));

If you had to read a lot of small files into lines and did not want to use the FileSystem or you were using Java 6 or Java 5, then you would create a utility class as follows:

public class IOUtils {

    public final static String CHARSET = "UTF-8";

...

public static List<String> readLines(File file) {
    try (FileReader reader = new FileReader(file)) {
        return readLines(reader);
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        return Exceptions.handle(List.class, ex);
    }
}

which calls readLines that takes a Reader:

public static List<String> readLines(Reader reader) {

    try (BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(reader)) {
          return readLines(bufferedReader);
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        return Exceptions.handle(List.class, ex);
    }
}

which calls readLines which takes a BufferedReader:

public static List<String> readLines(BufferedReader reader) {
    List<String> lines = new ArrayList<>(80);

    try (BufferedReader bufferedReader = reader) {


        String line = null;
        while ( (line = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
        lines.add(line);
        }

    } catch (Exception ex) {

        return Exceptions.handle(List.class, ex);
    }
    return lines;
}

Apache has a set of utilities called Apache commons (http://commons.apache.org/). It includes lang and it includes IO utils (http://commons.apache.org/proper/commons-io/). Either of these would be good to have if you are using Java 5 or Java 6.

Going back to our example, you could turn any location into a list of lines:

public static List<String> readLines(String location) {
    URI uri =  URI.create(location);

    try {

        if ( uri.getScheme()==null ) {

            Path thePath = FileSystems.getDefault().getPath(location);
            return Files.readAllLines(thePath, Charset.forName("UTF-8"));

        } else if ( uri.getScheme().equals("file") ) {

            Path thePath = FileSystems.getDefault().getPath(uri.getPath());
            return Files.readAllLines(thePath, Charset.forName("UTF-8"));

        } else {
            return readLines(location, uri);
        }

    } catch (Exception ex) {
         return Exceptions.handle(List.class, ex);
    }

}

FileSystem, Path, URI, etc. are all in the JDK.

Continuing the example:

private static List<String> readLines(String location, URI uri) throws Exception {
    try {

        FileSystem fileSystem = FileSystems.getFileSystem(uri);
        Path fsPath = fileSystem.getPath(location);
        return Files.readAllLines(fsPath, Charset.forName("UTF-8"));

    } catch (ProviderNotFoundException ex) {
         return readLines(uri.toURL().openStream());
    }
}

The above tries to read the uri from the FileSystem and if it can't load it, then it looks it up via a URL stream. URL, URI, File, FileSystem, etc. are all part of the JDK.

To turn the URL stream into a Reader and then into a string we use:

public static List<String> readLines(InputStream is) {

    try (Reader reader = new InputStreamReader(is, CHARSET)) {

        return readLines(reader);

    } catch (Exception ex) {

        return Exceptions.handle(List.class, ex);
    }
}

:)

Now let's return to our example (we can now read lines from anywhere including files):

public static final class Proxy {
    private final String address;
    private final int port;
    private static final String DATA_FILE = "./files/proxy.txt";

    private static final Pattern addressPattern = Pattern.compile("^(\\d{1,3}[.]{1}){3}[0-9]{1,3}$");

    private Proxy(String address, int port) {

        /* Validate address in not null.*/
        Objects.requireNonNull(address, "address should not be null");

        /* Validate port is in range. */
        if (port < 1 || port > 65535) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Port is not in range port=" + port);
        }

        /* Validate address is of the form 123.12.1.5 .*/
        if (!addressPattern.matcher(address).matches()) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid Inet address");
        }

        /* Now initialize our address and port. */
        this.address = address;
        this.port = port;
    }

    private static Proxy createProxy(String line) {
        String[] lineSplit = line.split(":");
        String address = lineSplit[0];
        int port =  parseInt(lineSplit[1]);
        return new Proxy(address, port);
    }

    public final String getAddress() {
        return address;
    }

    public final int getPort() {
        return port;
    }

    public static List<Proxy> loadProxies() {
        List <String> lines = IOUtils.readLines(DATA_FILE);
        List<Proxy> proxyList  = new ArrayList<>(lines.size());

        for (String line : lines) {
            proxyList.add(createProxy(line));
        }
        return proxyList;
    }

}

Notice we don't have any immutable state. This prevents bugs. And it makes your code easier to debug and support.

Notice our IOUtils.readLines which reads the lines from the file system.

Notice the extra work in the constructor to make sure no one initializes an instance of Proxy with bad state. These are all in the JDK Objects, Pattern, etc.

If you wanted a ProxyLoader that was reusable it would look something like this:

public static class ProxyLoader {
    private static final String DATA_FILE = "./files/proxy.txt";


    private List<Proxy> proxyList = Collections.EMPTY_LIST;
    private final String dataFile;

    public ProxyLoader() {
        this.dataFile = DATA_FILE;
        init();
    }

    public ProxyLoader(String dataFile) {
        this.dataFile = DATA_FILE;
        init();
    }

    private void init() {
        List <String> lines = IO.readLines(dataFile);
        proxyList = new ArrayList<>(lines.size());

        for (String line : lines) {
            proxyList.add(Proxy.createProxy(line));
        }
    }

    public String getDataFile() {
        return this.dataFile;
    }

    public static List<Proxy> loadProxies() {
            return new ProxyLoader().getProxyList();
    }

    public List<Proxy> getProxyList() {
        return proxyList;
    }
   ...

}

public static class Proxy {
    private final String address;
    private final int port;

    ...

    public Proxy(String address, int port) {
        ... 
        this.address = address;
        this.port = port;
    }

    public static Proxy createProxy(String line) {
        String[] lineSplit = line.split(":");
        String address = lineSplit[0];
        int port =  parseInt(lineSplit[1]);
        return new Proxy(address, port);
    }

    public String getAddress() {
        return address;
    }

    public int getPort() {
        return port;
    }
}

Coding is great. Testing is divine! Here are some tests for the example.

public static class ProxyLoader {
    private static final String DATA_FILE = "./files/proxy.txt";


    private List<Proxy> proxyList = Collections.EMPTY_LIST;
    private final String dataFile;

    public ProxyLoader() {
        this.dataFile = DATA_FILE;
        init();
    }

    public ProxyLoader(String dataFile) {
        this.dataFile = DATA_FILE;
        init();
    }

    private void init() {
        List <String> lines = IO.readLines(dataFile);
        proxyList = new ArrayList<>(lines.size());

        for (String line : lines) {
            proxyList.add(Proxy.createProxy(line));
        }
    }

    public String getDataFile() {
        return this.dataFile;
    }

    public static List<Proxy> loadProxies() {
            return new ProxyLoader().getProxyList();
    }

    public List<Proxy> getProxyList() {
        return proxyList;
    }

}

public static class Proxy {
    private final String address;
    private final int port;

    public Proxy(String address, int port) {
        this.address = address;
        this.port = port;
    }

    public static Proxy createProxy(String line) {
        String[] lineSplit = line.split(":");
        String address = lineSplit[0];
        int port =  parseInt(lineSplit[1]);
        return new Proxy(address, port);
    }

    public String getAddress() {
        return address;
    }

    public int getPort() {
        return port;
    }
}

Here is the alternative all in one class. (I did not see much point in ProxyLoader).

public static final class Proxy2 {
    private final String address;
    private final int port;
    private static final String DATA_FILE = "./files/proxy.txt";

    private static final Pattern addressPattern = Pattern.compile("^(\\d{1,3}[.]{1}){3}[0-9]{1,3}$");

    private Proxy2(String address, int port) {

        /* Validate address in not null.*/
        Objects.requireNonNull(address, "address should not be null");

        /* Validate port is in range. */
        if (port < 1 || port > 65535) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Port is not in range port=" + port);
        }

        /* Validate address is of the form 123.12.1.5 .*/
        if (!addressPattern.matcher(address).matches()) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid Inet address");
        }

        /* Now initialize our address and port. */
        this.address = address;
        this.port = port;
    }

    private static Proxy2 createProxy(String line) {
        String[] lineSplit = line.split(":");
        String address = lineSplit[0];
        int port =  parseInt(lineSplit[1]);
        return new Proxy2(address, port);
    }

    public final String getAddress() {
        return address;
    }

    public final int getPort() {
        return port;
    }

    public static List<Proxy2> loadProxies() {
        List <String> lines = IO.readLines(DATA_FILE);
        List<Proxy2> proxyList  = new ArrayList<>(lines.size());

        for (String line : lines) {
            proxyList.add(createProxy(line));
        }
        return proxyList;
    }

}

Now we write the tests (testing and TDD help you get past these issues):

@Test public void proxyTest() {
    List<Proxy> proxyList = ProxyLoader.loadProxies();
    assertEquals(
            5, len(proxyList)
    );


    assertEquals(
            "127.0.0.1", idx(proxyList, 0).getAddress()
    );



    assertEquals(
            8080, idx(proxyList, 0).getPort()
    );


    //192.55.55.57:9091
    assertEquals(
            "192.55.55.57", idx(proxyList, -1).getAddress()
    );



    assertEquals(
            9091, idx(proxyList, -1).getPort()
    );


}

The idx and such are defined in my own helper lib called boon. The idx method works like a Python or Ruby slice notation.

@Test public void proxyTest2() {
    List<Proxy2> proxyList = Proxy2.loadProxies();
    assertEquals(
            5, len(proxyList)
    );


    assertEquals(
            "127.0.0.1", idx(proxyList, 0).getAddress()
    );



    assertEquals(
            8080, idx(proxyList, 0).getPort()
    );


    //192.55.55.57:9091
    assertEquals(
            "192.55.55.57", idx(proxyList, -1).getAddress()
    );



    assertEquals(
            9091, idx(proxyList, -1).getPort()
    );


}

My input file

127.0.0.1:8080
192.55.55.55:9090
127.0.0.2:8080
192.55.55.56:9090
192.55.55.57:9091

And what about my IOUtils (which is actually called IO):

Here is the test for those who care for the IO (utils):

package org.boon.utils;

import com.sun.net.httpserver.Headers;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpExchange;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpHandler;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpServer;
import org.junit.Test;

import java.io.File;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.net.InetSocketAddress;
import java.net.URI;
import java.util.*;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

import static javax.lang.Integer.parseInt;
import static org.boon.utils.Lists.idx;
import static org.boon.utils.Lists.len;
import static org.boon.utils.Maps.copy;
import static org.boon.utils.Maps.map;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertTrue;

...

That give you an idea of the imports involved.

public class IOTest {

....

Here is a test to read lines from a file on the file system.

@Test
public void testReadLines() {
    File testDir = new File("src/test/resources");
    File testFile = new File(testDir, "testfile.txt");


    List<String> lines = IO.readLines(testFile);

    assertLines(lines);

}

Here is a helper method to assert that the file was read correctly.

private void assertLines(List<String> lines) {

    assertEquals(
            4, len(lines)
    );


    assertEquals(
            "line 1", idx(lines, 0)
    );



    assertEquals(
            "grapes", idx(lines, 3)
    );
}

Here is a test that shows reading a file from the a String path.

@Test
public void testReadLinesFromPath() {


    List<String> lines = IO.readLines("src/test/resources/testfile.txt");

    assertLines(lines);



}

This test shows reading a file from a URI.

@Test
public void testReadLinesURI() {

    File testDir = new File("src/test/resources");
    File testFile = new File(testDir, "testfile.txt");
    URI uri = testFile.toURI();


    //"file:///....src/test/resources/testfile.txt"
    List<String> lines = IO.readLines(uri.toString());
    assertLines(lines);


}

Here is a test that shows you can read lines form a file from an HTTP server:

static class MyHandler implements HttpHandler {
    public void handle(HttpExchange t) throws IOException {

        File testDir = new File("src/test/resources");
        File testFile = new File(testDir, "testfile.txt");
        String body = IO.read(testFile);
        t.sendResponseHeaders(200, body.length());
        OutputStream os = t.getResponseBody();
        os.write(body.getBytes(IO.CHARSET));
        os.close();
    }
}

Here is the HTTP server test (which insstantiates an HTTP server).

@Test
public void testReadFromHttp() throws Exception {

    HttpServer server = HttpServer.create(new InetSocketAddress(9666), 0);
    server.createContext("/test", new MyHandler());
    server.setExecutor(null); // creates a default executor
    server.start();

    Thread.sleep(1000);

    List<String> lines = IO.readLines("http://localhost:9666/test");
    assertLines(lines);

}

Here is the proxy cache test:

public static class ProxyLoader {
    private static final String DATA_FILE = "./files/proxy.txt";


    private List<Proxy> proxyList = Collections.EMPTY_LIST;
    private final String dataFile;

    public ProxyLoader() {
        this.dataFile = DATA_FILE;
        init();
    }

    public ProxyLoader(String dataFile) {
        this.dataFile = DATA_FILE;
        init();
    }

    private void init() {
        List <String> lines = IO.readLines(dataFile);
        proxyList = new ArrayList<>(lines.size());

        for (String line : lines) {
            proxyList.add(Proxy.createProxy(line));
        }
    }

    public String getDataFile() {
        return this.dataFile;
    }

    public static List<Proxy> loadProxies() {
            return new ProxyLoader().getProxyList();
    }

    public List<Proxy> getProxyList() {
        return proxyList;
    }

}

public static class Proxy {
    private final String address;
    private final int port;

    public Proxy(String address, int port) {
        this.address = address;
        this.port = port;
    }

    public static Proxy createProxy(String line) {
        String[] lineSplit = line.split(":");
        String address = lineSplit[0];
        int port =  parseInt(lineSplit[1]);
        return new Proxy(address, port);
    }

    public String getAddress() {
        return address;
    }

    public int getPort() {
        return port;
    }
}


public static final class Proxy2 {
    private final String address;
    private final int port;
    private static final String DATA_FILE = "./files/proxy.txt";

    private static final Pattern addressPattern = Pattern.compile("^(\\d{1,3}[.]{1}){3}[0-9]{1,3}$");

    private Proxy2(String address, int port) {

        /* Validate address in not null.*/
        Objects.requireNonNull(address, "address should not be null");

        /* Validate port is in range. */
        if (port < 1 || port > 65535) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Port is not in range port=" + port);
        }

        /* Validate address is of the form 123.12.1.5 .*/
        if (!addressPattern.matcher(address).matches()) {
            throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid Inet address");
        }

        /* Now initialize our address and port. */
        this.address = address;
        this.port = port;
    }

    private static Proxy2 createProxy(String line) {
        String[] lineSplit = line.split(":");
        String address = lineSplit[0];
        int port =  parseInt(lineSplit[1]);
        return new Proxy2(address, port);
    }

    public final String getAddress() {
        return address;
    }

    public final int getPort() {
        return port;
    }

    public static List<Proxy2> loadProxies() {
        List <String> lines = IO.readLines(DATA_FILE);
        List<Proxy2> proxyList  = new ArrayList<>(lines.size());

        for (String line : lines) {
            proxyList.add(createProxy(line));
        }
        return proxyList;
    }

}

@Test public void proxyTest() {
    List<Proxy> proxyList = ProxyLoader.loadProxies();
    assertEquals(
            5, len(proxyList)
    );


    assertEquals(
            "127.0.0.1", idx(proxyList, 0).getAddress()
    );



    assertEquals(
            8080, idx(proxyList, 0).getPort()
    );


    //192.55.55.57:9091
    assertEquals(
            "192.55.55.57", idx(proxyList, -1).getAddress()
    );



    assertEquals(
            9091, idx(proxyList, -1).getPort()
    );


}

Here is the actual proxy cache test:

@Test public void proxyTest2() {
    List<Proxy2> proxyList = Proxy2.loadProxies();
    assertEquals(
            5, len(proxyList)
    );


    assertEquals(
            "127.0.0.1", idx(proxyList, 0).getAddress()
    );



    assertEquals(
            8080, idx(proxyList, 0).getPort()
    );


    //192.55.55.57:9091
    assertEquals(
            "192.55.55.57", idx(proxyList, -1).getAddress()
    );



    assertEquals(
            9091, idx(proxyList, -1).getPort()
    );


}

}

You can see all of the source code for this example and this utility classes here:

https://github.com/RichardHightower/boon

https://github.com/RichardHightower/boon/blob/master/src/main/java/org/boon/utils/IO.java

Or come see me at:

http://rick-hightower.blogspot.com/

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