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I want to make a program in C language which will take the user input and I would not be able to understand the logic of the loop.

for ( c = 2 ; c <= n - 1 ; c++ )

The program code is given below:-

#include<stdio.h>
#include<conio.h>

void main()
{
   int n, c;

   printf("Enter a number to check if it is prime\n");
   scanf("%d", &n);

   for ( c = 2 ; c <= n - 1 ; c++ )
   {
      if ( n % c == 0 )
      {
         printf("%d is not prime.\n", n);
         break;
      }
   }
   if ( c == n )
      printf("%d is prime.\n", n);

   getch();
}

I have used the for loop which will end up the statement of n - 1 in for loop. If I will give the input 11 then it will end up on 11 - 1 = 10 then how it will give up the logic of if(c == n) { printf("%d", n);?

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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Oct 16 '13 at 13:21

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

1  
try stepping through with a debugger to see where you have made an incorrect assumption –  jk. Oct 16 '13 at 12:46
    
Are you asking how the program works? I'm confused, didn't you write it yourself? –  Andres F. Oct 16 '13 at 12:47
    
Please look on Stack Overflow. –  dbasnett Oct 16 '13 at 13:00
    
how i can transfer this question to stack overflow i am not very fimilar with this site please guide me. this is the algorithm i have written it is not written by me. the truth is that i would not be able to understand the logic of prime numbers in c .. –  Tayyab Gulsher Vohra Oct 16 '13 at 13:10
    
@TayyabGulsherVohra you can flag it for moderator attention, or the community will migrate it when we get 5 votes –  jk. Oct 16 '13 at 13:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I will give the input 11 then it will end up on 11 - 1 = 10 then how it will give up the logic of if(c == n) { printf("%d", n);?

Now correctly understand your for loop condition:

for ( c = 2 ; c <= n - 1 ; c++ )
              ^^^^^^^^^^^^
              2 <= 11 - 1  -> True   // {for block executes }
              3 <= 11 - 1  -> True   // {for block executes }
                 :
                 :
              9 <= 11 - 1  -> True   // {for block executes }
              10 <= 11 - 1  -> True  // {for block executes }
              11 <= 11 - 1  -> False  breaks //{And Now for block NOT executes}

if (c == n)
    ^^^^^^
   11 == 11 -> True  // {if block executes} 

According to for loop condition c <= n - 1, loop breaks when c value becomes equals to n. So if n is equals to 11 loop condition is true for c = 2 to c = 10, in each iteration c increments by one (using c++ increment) when c becomes 11 (ot say n) then condition c <= n - 1 become false and loop breaks.

In if condition (after for loop) c value compared with n. that is:

if ( c == n )
//   11 == 11  that is true

for n = 11 it becomes and c = 11 if condition evaluates true and printf() associated with if executes.


It is also important to understand that the for-loop only terminates for c = n when n is a prime number, but if suppose n is a non-prime number then for-loop will break for c value less then n - 1 due to break; statement in nested if block in for-loop.

for( c = 2; c <= n - 1; c++ ) 
{
  if(n % c == 0)<=="for Non-prime `n`, if condition will be true for some `c < n - 1`"
  {  ^^^^^^^^^^^ True 
     printf("%d is not prime.\n", n);
     break; <== "move control outside for-loop"
  }  //      | 
}    //      |
// <---------+ // if break; executes control moves here with c < n - 1
if (c == n)<== "this condition will evaluates FALSE"  
   ^^^^^^^^ False

For example if n = 8 then in very first iteration of for-loop with value c = 2 if condition if(n % c == 0) that evaluates as if(8 % 2 == 0) == if( 0 == 0) = True and break; statement inside if-block moves control outside for-loop(as shown in figure).

Because this time for loop not terminated due to c <= n - 1 condition but braked because of if(n % c == 0) so out-side for-loop c value is less than n hence if (c == n) evaluates as False.

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+1 expect the examples will help the OP –  jk. Oct 16 '13 at 13:40
    
@jk. Thanks! :) –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 16 '13 at 13:41
    
@GrijeshChauhan Chauhan thankx buddy i can understand the loop now properly. –  Tayyab Gulsher Vohra Oct 17 '13 at 14:28
    
@TayyabGulsherVohra Very good, I am glad that I could help you..Good Luck! :) –  Grijesh Chauhan Oct 17 '13 at 14:30
    
@GrijeshChauhan it takes me 4 days to understand this .. –  Tayyab Gulsher Vohra Oct 17 '13 at 14:31

The for loop loops from c = 2 to c = n - 1 except it hit's the break statement. If it does, it will jump out of the loop. If you never break then your c will actually be n after the loop.

And here is why. The loop works like this:

  1. initialize the for loop with c = 2
  2. Check for condition (c <= n - 1) if true: execute loop body if false: jump past loop
  3. increment c by one
  4. goto 2.

Example: Suppose your n is 3.

  1. we set c to 2, now c == 2 and n == 3
  2. 2 <= 3 - 1 is true, so the loop body will be executed
  3. we increment c by 1, now c == 3 and n == 3
  4. we go back to 2. in the description
  5. 3 <= 3 - 1 is false, so we don't execute the loop body now and jump out of the loop
  6. after we left the loop c == 3 and n == 3 so c == n

So if we never hit the break statement c will be equal to n after the loop. We hit the break statement if n is not prime. If we break c will miss at least one increment and thus c < n after the loop. Now c == n will evaluate to false and the if statements body of if ( c == n ) will not be executed.

Now to the if ( n%c == 0 ). n%cmeans n modulo c, so the remainder of the division of n by c. If this remainder is 0 then c is an integer divisor of n. So in the loop you are testing n for any divisor bigger than 1 and smaller than n.

If there is a divisor of n except 1 and itself, n can't be prime. So if you hit any c with 1 < c < n that makes n%cequal to 0 n can't be prime.

Hint: You don't have to test for divisors bigger than √n.

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2  
Isn't it until √n? –  Sharon J D Dorot Oct 16 '13 at 13:30
    
You are right. Corrected. –  TheMorph Oct 16 '13 at 13:34
1  
The question isn't very clear, but to my reading this doesn't answer it. –  jk. Oct 16 '13 at 13:44
    
You are right, too. ;) I answered the question before it was rephrased and interpreted it wrong. I hope my edit answers the question better. –  TheMorph Oct 16 '13 at 14:03

Your assumption that c ends up being n - 1 is incorrect. If you step through your program with the debugger you should see that for n == 11, c == 11 at the end of the loop.

If we don't break early then the last time the loop body executes is indeed when c == n - 1 however c is then incremented and the loop invariant test fails so after the loop c == n.

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Consider what it means when you say that a number is prime. A number p is prime when for every n>1, n<p, the remainder r = 0 for p/n = r.

So, this loop runs through each value (c) the range [2..p-1], testing for the remainder.

int isprime = 1; //use a flag to indicate prime, assume prime until proven otherwise
for ( c = 2 ; //initialize c=2, the first value in the range [2..p-1]
      c <= n - 1 ; //check whether c is still in the range [2..p-1]
      c++ ) //increment c to the next value in the range [2..p-1]
{
    if ( n % c == 0 ) //modulo '%' is the remainder of the integer division
    {
        isprime = 0;
        break;
    }
}
printf("%d %s prime.\n", n, isprime?"is":"is not");

Rather than test that the number is prime by checking a side effect of the loop counter, why not set a flag before the loop, and then test it as the decision for prime at the end? The result is code that is less fragile, error-prone, and clearer.

Want to save about half the work? Once you test n%2, we know that there is no number k such that k*2=n, right? so check the range [2..p/2], and change your loop to,

for( c = 2; c <= n/2; c++ )

Can you think of a number smaller than n/2 that works?

An interesting algorithm for finding multiple primes is the Sieve of Erastosthenes.

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Instead use for (c= 2; c<=(int)sqrt(n); c++) –  dark Jan 5 at 12:47

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