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I'm working on a custom ARM board, for which I'm using a dirty kernel. I've build a root filesystem using wheezy (debian 7.2) armhf. I can see the debian boot log messages when I boot this root file system in Qemu (qemu-system-arm). I don't see them either on the framebuffer of the ARM board, or the serial console. console= is properly set in the kernel commandline, and I do see the kernel log messages when the system boots up.

What kernel config option, if any, could be causing this? I'm working to clean up this kernel I have and make it non dirty. Or is there a Debian config that governs the log behaviour? I have tried putting VERBOSE in /etc/default/rcS

I've already tried putting verbose and debug on the commandline. Installing bootlogd didn't help either - the boot log (/var/log/boot) turned up empty.

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What command line parameter passing to kernel? –  vinay hunachyal Oct 16 '13 at 17:37

2 Answers 2

Have a look at all these options:

  1. Check that serial console is enabled (see in Device Drivers -> Character Devices -> Serial Drivers in the kernel configuration)
  2. Check that specific serial driver is enabled in the kernel configuration
  3. Check that console=xxx is set among kernel boot options (it can be either on U-Boot bootargs option or hardcoded in the kernel configuration)
  4. Check that debug is set among kernel boot options (it can be either on U-Boot bootargs option or hardcoded in the kernel configuration)
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After having a look at this post grep -rn PTY sysvinit-2.88dsf/ confirmed that hint

sysvinit-2.88dsf/man/bootlogd.8:60:(Consequently \fBbootlogd\fP requires PTY support in the kernel configuration.)

So CONFIG_LEGACY_PTYS should be set in the kernel configuration, which is currently not

2831:# CONFIG_LEGACY_PTYS is not set

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