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It should be something really simple, but I have not been successful in getting this to work using blocks. There are questions and answers to this, but all of them I found are solved by the use of CABasicAnimation and not by UIView Block-Based Animation, which is what I am after.

The following code doesn't work (Block-Based), no animation:

CGAffineTransform spin = CGAffineTransformRotate(spiningView.transform, DEGREES_RADIANS(360));

CATransform3D identity = CATransform3DIdentity;
CATransform3D spin2 =  CATransform3DRotate(identity, DEGREES_RADIANS(360), 0.0f, 0.0f, 1.0f);


[UIView animateWithDuration:3.0f
                      delay:0.0f
                    options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveLinear
                 animations:^
                 {
                     spiningView.transform = spin;
                     //spiningView.layer.transform = spin2;
                     //Have also tried the above, doesn't work either.
                 }
                 completion:^(BOOL finished)
                 {
                     spiningView.transform = spin;
                     //spiningView.layer.transform = spin2;
                 }];

From my understanding, when every time we use Block-Based, no animation would occur, when UIViewAnimation Block "sees" that the begin value is the same as the final value. Fair enough, setting it to move to 360 degree would mean that the object stays where it is. But it has to be a way to use Block-Based Animation to make this animate, because the following CABasicAnimation would work flawlessly:

CABasicAnimation* rotationAnimation;
rotationAnimation = [CABasicAnimation animationWithKeyPath:@"transform.rotation.z"];
rotationAnimation.fromValue = [NSNumber numberWithFloat:0.0f];
rotationAnimation.toValue = [NSNumber numberWithFloat: M_PI * 2.0f];
rotationAnimation.duration = 3.0f;
rotationAnimation.cumulative = YES;
rotationAnimation.repeatCount = 1;
[spiningView.layer addAnimation:rotationAnimation forKey:@"rotationAnimation"];  

In Addition, the following Block-Based works, but there is a stop in between animations (first it rotates to 180 degrees, then therefrom to make another 180 degrees to complete the rotation), which is not what I am after:

[UIView animateWithDuration:3.0f
                      delay:0.0f
                    options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveLinear
                 animations:^
                 {
                     spiningView.transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(spiningView.transform, DEGREES_RADIANS(180));;
                 }
                 completion:^(BOOL finished)
                 {                         
                     [UIView animateWithDuration:3.0f
                                           delay:0.0f
                                         options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveLinear
                                      animations:^
                                      {
                                         spiningView.transform = CGAffineTransformRotate(spiningView.transform, DEGREES_RADIANS(360));
                                      }
                                      completion:^(BOOL finished)
                                      {

                                      }];

                 }];

I know I could save a lot of time and just surrender myself to using CABasicAnimation and be done with it, but I would like to know why one works and the other doesn't in this case (making a 360 degree rotation). I hope that you can give me a detailed explanation regarding this between the 2 in this case and some code (Block-Based) that can carry out a complete 360 degree rotation.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't the second transform (in the block-based solution) use 180 degrees, since it's a transformation over the current transform property at that point (which is already 180 degrees)? Also have you tried just using CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(M_PI*2) in a single animations block? – matehat Oct 16 '13 at 14:47
    
@matehat Within the second animation block in the second block-based solution is in fact 360 degrees, if I used 180 degrees, it would just rotate to 180 degrees (by the first animation block) and stops there. It also seems strange to me that I have to set 360 degrees within the second nested-block instead of 180. – Unheilig Oct 16 '13 at 14:51
up vote 26 down vote accepted

With UIView animations, Core Animation computes the shortest path between the initial transform and the final transform. The 360° rotation doesn't work because the final transform is the same as the initial transform.

For what it's worth, I've just tried the following code which makes four 90° rotations smoothly with no delay between rotations:

- (void)rotateSpinningView
{
    [UIView animateWithDuration:1.5 delay:0 options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveLinear animations:^{
        [spiningView setTransform:CGAffineTransformRotate(spiningView.transform, M_PI_2)];
    } completion:^(BOOL finished) {
        if (finished && !CGAffineTransformEqualToTransform(spiningView.transform, CGAffineTransformIdentity)) {
            [self rotateSpinningView];
        }
    }];
}
share|improve this answer
    
These should have been another SO question really as there's some good talking points for open discussion. Given that's the case, I'm going to keep my answers brief and structure them as individual comments. – neilco Oct 16 '13 at 20:04
    
1. GCD block-based animations are implicit animations and are really for animating the view's animatable properties, one of which is view.transform. – neilco Oct 16 '13 at 20:06
    
2. To be honest, I don't know. – neilco Oct 16 '13 at 20:10
    
3. CABasicAnimation is an explicit animation, not implicit as you said. – neilco Oct 16 '13 at 20:11
1  
This is a cool solution, but why four M_PI_2 (90 degree) rotations instead of two M_PI (180 degree)? – m_katsifarakis Dec 4 '15 at 1:23

This is something iOS 7's keyframe animations are well suited to. For example, you can split one full rotation of view into three parts:

CGFloat direction = 1.0f;  // -1.0f to rotate other way
view.transform = CGAffineTransformIdentity;
[UIView animateKeyframesWithDuration:1.0 delay:0.0
                               options:UIViewKeyframeAnimationOptionCalculationModePaced | UIViewAnimationOptionCurveEaseInOut
                            animations:^{
                              [UIView addKeyframeWithRelativeStartTime:0.0 relativeDuration:0.0 animations:^{
                                view.transform = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(M_PI * 2.0f / 3.0f * direction);
                              }];
                              [UIView addKeyframeWithRelativeStartTime:0.0 relativeDuration:0.0 animations:^{
                                view.transform = CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(M_PI * 4.0f / 3.0f * direction);
                              }];
                              [UIView addKeyframeWithRelativeStartTime:0.0 relativeDuration:0.0 animations:^{
                                view.transform = CGAffineTransformIdentity;
                              }];
                            }
                            completion:^(BOOL finished) {}];

Note that when using UIViewKeyframeAnimationOptionCalculationModePaced you can leave all the start times and durations blank.

share|improve this answer
1  
Three parts is the minimum you need to make the direction of rotation unambiguous (with two, it could go either clockwise or anticlockwise in each step). The animation is smooth. – jawj Sep 10 '14 at 13:34
    
since ios 7 this should be the answer – dowi Jun 7 '15 at 13:21

Here is a more complete version of neilco's rotateSpinningView.

It spins clockwise or counter clockwise. It has a completion: parameter and it starts and stops easy.

+ (void)rotateSpinningView:(UIView *)view direction:(BOOL)clockwise completion:(void (^)(BOOL finished))completion
{
    int dir = clockwise ? 1 : -1;
    UIViewAnimationOptions opt = UIViewAnimationOptionCurveLinear;
    if (CGAffineTransformEqualToTransform(view.transform, CGAffineTransformIdentity)) {
        opt = UIViewAnimationOptionCurveEaseIn;
    }
    else if (CGAffineTransformEqualToTransform(CGAffineTransformRotate(view.transform, dir * M_PI_2), CGAffineTransformIdentity)) {
        opt = UIViewAnimationOptionCurveEaseOut;
    }
    [UIView animateWithDuration:0.5f delay:0.0f options:opt animations:^{
        [view setTransform:CGAffineTransformRotate(view.transform, dir * M_PI_2)];
    } completion:^(BOOL finished) {
        if (finished && !CGAffineTransformEqualToTransform(view.transform, CGAffineTransformIdentity)) {
            [self rotateSpinningView:view direction:clockwise completion:completion];
        }
        else if (completion && finished && CGAffineTransformEqualToTransform(view.transform, CGAffineTransformIdentity)) {
            completion(finished);
        }
    }];
}
share|improve this answer

@neilco put a very good solution but it is an infinite rotation.

Based on his code, I modify a bit to implement a one loop rotation.

#define DEGREES_TO_RADIANS(angle) ((angle) / 180.0 * M_PI)
- (void)rotateSpinningView:(UIView *)spiningView stop:(BOOL)stop {
[UIView animateWithDuration:0.5 delay:0 options:UIViewAnimationOptionCurveLinear animations:^{
    double rads = DEGREES_TO_RADIANS(180);
    if (stop) {
        rads = DEGREES_TO_RADIANS(360);
    }
    [spiningView setTransform:CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(rads)];
} completion:^(BOOL finished) {
    if (finished && !stop && !CGAffineTransformEqualToTransform(spiningView.transform, CGAffineTransformIdentity)) {
        [self rotateSpinningView:spiningView stop:YES];
    }
}];

}

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