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I am having a json like follows

var obj = {
    "key1" : ["value1"],
    "key2" : ["value2"],
    "key3" : ["value3"],
    "key4" : ["value4"]
}

What i need is if any thing updated or changed in values the corresponding object should move to last position. For eg., If value2 is changed to new value2 then i need to move "key2" and the new value to last position. (i.e) as follows

var obj = {
    "key1" : ["value1"],
    "key3" : ["value3"],
    "key4" : ["value4"],
    "key2" : ["new value2"]
}

how to do this in json?

share|improve this question
    
you don't deal with json directly. it's just a string. You decode the JSON into a native data structure, manipulate that structure however you want, then convert it BACK to a json string. Plus, the ordering of keys in a structure is not relevant to JSON. you might get alphabetical, you might get internal storage order, whatever. there's no guarantee HOW the string will be produced. –  Marc B Oct 16 '13 at 14:37
4  
they're just objects, btw. not json. objects don't have a sort order, therefore there is no way of doing what you want without turning your object into an array instead. –  Kevin B Oct 16 '13 at 14:37
    
Why do you want to move it to last position? What ever the position, they represent a property. –  Murali Oct 16 '13 at 14:39
    
Well, i guess technically you could keep a separate array that stored the order of the object keys... but that's a bit much when switching to an array isn't very difficult. –  Kevin B Oct 16 '13 at 14:39

2 Answers 2

Objects/JSONs have no guaranteed order. Replace your wrapper with an Array.

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1  
You mean object, not JSON. –  Rory McCrossan Oct 16 '13 at 14:39
    
Because a JSON string can also represent an array, which DOES have a guaranteed order. –  Kevin B Oct 16 '13 at 14:40
1  
I wouldn't bet my money on it. According to JSON.org they do, but in my experience they are handled inconsistently across browsers. –  Andrei Nemes Oct 16 '13 at 14:44

Change your wrapper object of type array.

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That's invalid syntax. Arrays don't have keys like that. –  SLaks Oct 16 '13 at 14:41

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