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So inside my <script> tags, I have these functions.

$.fn.getRandom = function(min, max) {
    return min + Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min + 1));
}

function placeRandom() {
    alert(getRandom(1,7));
}

and I call the placeRandom() function like so

$(document).ready(function() {
    placeRandom();
});

when I do this, it gives me an

Object expected

error and refers to the line where I wrote

alert(getRandom(1.7));

Now, my main question is if there is anything wrong with the code which I am showing you, or does it look correct? Because if it looks correct then I think i'm going to have to run through the rest of my entire code and look for maybe a open bracket which isn't closed because that might be the problem. So yea, is there any problem with my placeRandom() or getRandom() function or is the error occuring because of another reason other than these functions?

share|improve this question
4  
You are binding getRandom to the jQuery namespace, you will only be able to access it through a jQuery object instance or via $.fn.getRandom() – Andrei Nemes Oct 16 '13 at 14:51
    
with the way you are calling getRandom, i think you just want a standard function. getRandom function(min,max)... – PlantTheIdea Oct 16 '13 at 14:51
    
Why are you using $.fn? – SLaks Oct 16 '13 at 14:52
    
Oh, okay, I will change it to getRandom function() instead. – user2719875 Oct 16 '13 at 14:54
    
Yes. That's exactly what I mean. Only attach a function to jQuery if you want to integrate it in the library (like a plug-in). See my answer – Andrei Nemes Oct 16 '13 at 14:55
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is were you are defining the getRandom function. You are putting it in the jQuery.fn namespace. If you organize your code like the following it should work much better.

var getRandom = function(min, max) {
    return min + Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min + 1));
}

var placeRandom = function() {
    alert(getRandom(1,7));
}

$(document).ready(function() {
    placeRandom();
});

Additional Info: jQuery.fn is actually a prototype but is commonly referred to as a namespace in this specific context.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a prototype, not a namespace. – SLaks Oct 16 '13 at 14:53
    
Very true, I will clarify in my answer. – Tom Oct 16 '13 at 14:57
    
Nevermind, okay it works, just tried it. – user2719875 Oct 16 '13 at 15:01
1  
Yes, jsfiddle.net/TomLee/kfrVV – Tom Oct 16 '13 at 15:03

You are binding getRandom to the jQuery namespace, you will only be able to access it through a jQuery object instance or via $.fn.getRandom()

So unless you want to be able to call it like $(selector).getRandom(), just declare it as a standard function.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a prototype, not a namespace. – SLaks Oct 16 '13 at 14:53
    
It's a namespace pointing to the jQuery prototype. Wanna argue semantics? – Andrei Nemes Oct 16 '13 at 14:53
    
nevermind, okay it works. thanks. – user2719875 Oct 16 '13 at 15:02
1  
Yes, it will. Try it :) – Andrei Nemes Oct 16 '13 at 15:03
    
In JavaScript, functions are first class citizens, which means you can do a lot of fun stuff with them, such as passing them as arguments to other functions, storing their references in variables or using them in objects. – Andrei Nemes Oct 16 '13 at 15:07

you are binding getRandom to the $ namespace (jQuery). so you have to call it $.fn.getRandom(1,7) or define the function the following:

function getRandom(min, max) {
    return min + Math.floor(Math.random() * (max - min + 1));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nevermind, okay thanks. – user2719875 Oct 16 '13 at 15:02

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