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I see many projects using

$(document).on('ready', function(e){
 //jquery stuff
})

Instead of:

$( document ).ready(function(  ) {
  // Code using $ as usual goes here.
});

or

 $(function() {
  // Handler for .ready() called.
 });

I read complete the api documentation but I don't see what is the case of use the first example.

For me the first example is useless the use of on

What is the differences in both cases?

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Possible duplicate : stackoverflow.com/questions/13589307/… –  SRy Oct 16 '13 at 15:57
    
You should be using the latest JQuery ready syntax anyway i.e.: $(function() { // Code using $ as usual goes here. }); :) –  TrueBlueAussie Oct 16 '13 at 16:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The function:

$( document ).ready(function ( ) {
  // Code using $ as usual goes here.
});

Translates to:

$( document ).on( 'ready', function (e) {
 //jquery stuff
})

This is the same with these shorthand functions:

$( element ).click( function ( ) { } );
$( element ).hover( function ( ) { } );
$( element ).load( function ( ) { } );
$( element ).scroll( function ( ) { } );

From the documentation of .click( handler(eventObject) ):

This method is a shortcut for .on( "click", handler ) in the first two variations, and .trigger( "click" ) in the third.


Updated Answer - The difference!

There is also $(document).on( "ready", handler ), deprecated as of jQuery 1.8. This behaves similarly to the ready method but if the ready event has already fired and you try to .on( "ready" ) the bound handler will not be executed. Ready handlers bound this way are executed after any bound by the other three methods above.

Update #2

jQuery(function(){});

should also be considered as a shorter alternative to

jQuery(document).ready(function(){});

It is genuinely prefered since it does not reduce readability and removes a few bytes of character.

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2  
Don't forget to add the callbacks, otherwise it will be interpreted as a trigger. ;-) –  Ionică Bizău Oct 16 '13 at 15:57
    
@Johnツ Sure... :) Thanks. :) –  Praveen Kumar Oct 16 '13 at 15:58
1  
Very good, +1 :-) –  Ionică Bizău Oct 16 '13 at 15:59
    
Then are both the same thing? –  Emilio Gort Oct 16 '13 at 15:59
1  
thanks...I'll accept in 8 min –  Emilio Gort Oct 16 '13 at 16:00

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