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trying to work out how to finish off this method

With this version, the final "tax cannot be resolved to a variable"

public double calculateTax() {

  if (salary < 9440){
    double tax = 0;
  }
  else {
    double newSalary = salary - 9440;


    if (newSalary <= 32010) {
      double tax = newSalary*0.2;
    } else {
      double tax1 = 32010*0.2;
      double tax2 = (newSalary - 32010)*0.4;
      double tax = tax1 + tax2;
    }
  } 
  return tax;
}

However, with this version the "method does not return a result of type double"

public double calculateTax() {

  if (salary < 9440){
    double tax = 0;
  } else {
    double newSalary = salary - 9440;


    if (newSalary <= 32010) {
      double tax = newSalary*0.2;
    } else {
      double tax1 = 32010*0.2;
      double tax2 = (newSalary - 32010)*0.4;
      double tax = tax1 + tax2;

      return tax;
    }
  } 
}

I can't define a separate field for tax for this project - where should I be putting return tax? Thank you :)

share|improve this question
2  
You should look up variable scope. – Rohan Oct 16 '13 at 16:40
    
Please check your curly brackets and re-indent your code accordingly. – PM 77-1 Oct 16 '13 at 16:41
    
Always carefully match your curly brackets! – Hot Licks Oct 16 '13 at 16:42

In the first case, the tax is within the if and else blocks, hence its not visible outside them. Thus the error at the return statement.

In the second case, the return is inside an else and that makes it a conditional return. Thus the second error.

All this boils down to a concept called scope. The scope of a variable is within the block it is defined. It cannot be accessed outside its declaration scope. The scope can be method level, block level, instance level, etc.

Declare the tax variable at the start of the method, outside any of the blocks and it'll work.

public double calculateTax() {
    double tax; // Declare here
    ..
    // Now remove double keyword from every other place where you've used tax
    // Use the tax created at the beginning of the method all around.
}

And finally, your return should be as in the first case. Outside any of the if or else blocks, because your method needs to return a double value under all circumstances(not conditionally).

share|improve this answer
    
thank you! that really helps :) – Student94 Oct 16 '13 at 16:52
1  
@Nelly - Do accept the answer if it helped you!:) – R.J Oct 16 '13 at 16:59

You need to define it at the start of your method.

double tax = 0;

then refer to it (without redefining it) elsewhere. For example

tax = newSalary*0.2;

instead of

double tax = newSalary*0.2;
share|improve this answer

Just do like this, instead of declaring tax multiple times, which is not necessary.

public double calculateTax() {
    double tax = 0;

    //Other codes here (if else etc)

    return tax;

}

share|improve this answer

You need to declare tax outside of the if:

double tax;
if (salary < 9440){
   tax = 0;
}
else {
share|improve this answer

Just declare the tax variable at the beginning of the method (i.e., not inside any if block), and return it at the end:

public double calculateTax() {
    double tax = 0;
    double newSalary = salary;

    if (newSalary >= 9440) {
      double newSalary -= 9440;
    }

    if (newSalary <= 32010) {
      double tax = newSalary*0.2;
    }
    else {
      double tax1 = 32010*0.2;
      double tax2 = (newSalary - 32010)*0.4;
      tax = tax1 + tax2;
    }

    return tax;
}

Note: I tried to retain your variable names and flow wherever possible to make the answer easier to understand. You should, however, probably be using double literals instead of int literals (e.g., 32010.0 instead of 32010) - or better yet, double constants.

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Your code is confusing, badly formatted, and littered with magic numbers. Style matters: pay more attention to how you write your code. Sloppy style makes your code harder to read and understand.

I might write it this way:

public double calculateTax() {
    double tax = 0.0;
    if (salary < 9440) {
       tax = 0.0;
    } else {
       double newSalary = salary - 9440;
       if (newSalary <= 32010) {
           tax = newSalary*0.2;
       } else {
           double tax1 = 32010*0.2;
           double tax2 = (newSalary - 32010)*0.4;
           tax = tax1 + tax2;
       }
    } 
    return tax;
}

Or I might not. Bad stuff.

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Have you learned about variable scope yet? You are declaring your double tax inside a block, that is, a group of code surrounded byu {} therefore it only has scope within that block. You are then trying to return it elsewhere, outside that block.

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